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Suicidality and Intersectionality Among Students Identifying as Nonheterosexual and With a Disability

Suicidality and Intersectionality Among Students Identifying as Nonheterosexual and With a... Research about students with disabilities and students identifying as LGBQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning) reveals that both populations report more suicidality and peer victimization and less school connectedness than do their peers. No study has previously examined the intersection of these identities with regard to peer victimization, school connectedness, and suicidality. Using a sample of 11,364 high school students, we examined the relationships among these identities, peer victimization, and school connectedness with suicidal ideation. Compared with their peers without either identity, students identifying with one of these identities reported higher levels of suicidal ideation. School connectedness and peer victimization each moderated the association between identity and suicidal ideation. In addition, students who were victimized more than their peers and who identified both with a disability and as LGBQ (n = 250) reported the highest levels of suicidal ideation. School-based victimization and suicide prevention programs should consider students’ multiple identities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Exceptional Children SAGE

Suicidality and Intersectionality Among Students Identifying as Nonheterosexual and With a Disability

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References (58)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2017
ISSN
0014-4029
eISSN
2163-5560
DOI
10.1177/0014402917736261
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research about students with disabilities and students identifying as LGBQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning) reveals that both populations report more suicidality and peer victimization and less school connectedness than do their peers. No study has previously examined the intersection of these identities with regard to peer victimization, school connectedness, and suicidality. Using a sample of 11,364 high school students, we examined the relationships among these identities, peer victimization, and school connectedness with suicidal ideation. Compared with their peers without either identity, students identifying with one of these identities reported higher levels of suicidal ideation. School connectedness and peer victimization each moderated the association between identity and suicidal ideation. In addition, students who were victimized more than their peers and who identified both with a disability and as LGBQ (n = 250) reported the highest levels of suicidal ideation. School-based victimization and suicide prevention programs should consider students’ multiple identities.

Journal

Exceptional ChildrenSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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