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The Causal Relationship between African American Fertility and Female Labor Supply: Policy Implications

The Causal Relationship between African American Fertility and Female Labor Supply: Policy... THE CAUSAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AFRICAN AMERICAN FERTILITY AND FEMALE LABOR SUPPLY: POLICY IMPLICATIONS by Benjamin S. Cheng INTRODUCTION It is well documented in the literature that African American (or black American) women tend to have relatively higher fertility than white women, even though it has declined precipitously in the past three de- cades (for the young cohorts, recent black and white fertility rates are comparable). On the other hand, Bell observes that black wives who work full time most likely come from the more stable and better educated families. 1 Some have also noted that children less often deter married black women from working full time, year round, and that married black women have contributed a greater proportion of family earnings than married white women. 2 In short, black women with children are more likely to work than white women with children. Thus, blacks have exhib- ited unique characteristics in fertility and labor participation patterns, which appear somewhat different from the rest of the population and therefore merit further investigation. Although numerous studies have been undertaken on the relation be- tween black female participation (FR hereafter) and black fertility (BR hereafter) in the literature, most past studies 3 employ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Black Political Economy SAGE

The Causal Relationship between African American Fertility and Female Labor Supply: Policy Implications

Review of Black Political Economy , Volume 25 (2): 12 – Dec 1, 1996

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References (39)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1996 National Economic Association
ISSN
0034-6446
eISSN
1936-4814
DOI
10.1007/BF02690069
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE CAUSAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AFRICAN AMERICAN FERTILITY AND FEMALE LABOR SUPPLY: POLICY IMPLICATIONS by Benjamin S. Cheng INTRODUCTION It is well documented in the literature that African American (or black American) women tend to have relatively higher fertility than white women, even though it has declined precipitously in the past three de- cades (for the young cohorts, recent black and white fertility rates are comparable). On the other hand, Bell observes that black wives who work full time most likely come from the more stable and better educated families. 1 Some have also noted that children less often deter married black women from working full time, year round, and that married black women have contributed a greater proportion of family earnings than married white women. 2 In short, black women with children are more likely to work than white women with children. Thus, blacks have exhib- ited unique characteristics in fertility and labor participation patterns, which appear somewhat different from the rest of the population and therefore merit further investigation. Although numerous studies have been undertaken on the relation be- tween black female participation (FR hereafter) and black fertility (BR hereafter) in the literature, most past studies 3 employ

Journal

Review of Black Political EconomySAGE

Published: Dec 1, 1996

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