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The Health Belief Model and Sick Role Behavior*

The Health Belief Model and Sick Role Behavior* The Health Belief Model and Sick Role Behavior* Marshall H. Becker, Ph.D., M.P.H. Associate Professor Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine, and Hygiene and Public Health Baltimore, Maryland Most research directed at understanding ”activity undertaken by those who consider themselves ill, for the purpose of getting well” has yielded an unsystematic multiplicity of findings which are often either not predictive of such patient compliance,’” or are mutually contradictory.7.8 These difficulties arise, in part, from past dependence on a “medical” model of patient behavior, which stresses such easily identified and quantified dimensions as characteristics of the patient (e.g., demographic and social),6~B~lO the regimen (e.g., type, complexity, discomfort, duration),ll-l3 and the illness (e.g., medically-defined seriousness, duration, disability).7,14J5 Limitations of the Medical Model Several major deficiencies of this approach can be identified. First, such ascribed, organic, and environmental characteristics are relatively enduring and unalterable. Thus, even if it were possible to demonstrate a consistent relationship between one or more of these factors and lack of patient cooperation, little could be done to improve the situation. Second, because background, physiological, and structural concepts are not necessarily related to motivations, findings in this area are not able to account for the large numbers of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health Education Monographs SAGE

The Health Belief Model and Sick Role Behavior*

Health Education Monographs , Volume 2 (4): 11 – Dec 1, 1974

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References (58)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1974 Society for Public Health Education
ISSN
0073-1455
eISSN
1552-6127
DOI
10.1177/109019817400200407
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Health Belief Model and Sick Role Behavior* Marshall H. Becker, Ph.D., M.P.H. Associate Professor Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine, and Hygiene and Public Health Baltimore, Maryland Most research directed at understanding ”activity undertaken by those who consider themselves ill, for the purpose of getting well” has yielded an unsystematic multiplicity of findings which are often either not predictive of such patient compliance,’” or are mutually contradictory.7.8 These difficulties arise, in part, from past dependence on a “medical” model of patient behavior, which stresses such easily identified and quantified dimensions as characteristics of the patient (e.g., demographic and social),6~B~lO the regimen (e.g., type, complexity, discomfort, duration),ll-l3 and the illness (e.g., medically-defined seriousness, duration, disability).7,14J5 Limitations of the Medical Model Several major deficiencies of this approach can be identified. First, such ascribed, organic, and environmental characteristics are relatively enduring and unalterable. Thus, even if it were possible to demonstrate a consistent relationship between one or more of these factors and lack of patient cooperation, little could be done to improve the situation. Second, because background, physiological, and structural concepts are not necessarily related to motivations, findings in this area are not able to account for the large numbers of

Journal

Health Education MonographsSAGE

Published: Dec 1, 1974

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