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The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action: Impacts on Pakistan–Iran Relations

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action: Impacts on Pakistan–Iran Relations The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) will impact the Iran–Pakistan relations in many ways including the prospects of the Pakistan–Iran gas pipeline and other energy issues which had earlier been halted due to sanctions and the American pressure. Trade will become flexible, and Pakistan will import oil and export rice, but there are issues than those pertaining to the sanctions which had governed bilateral trade that will continue to be an irritant. Iran would be more assertive on Balochistan, especially on the Jundullah and other rebel groups entering into its Sistan–Baluchistan province from Pakistan. Moreover, Afghanistan will present its own challenges as Iran might have more in common with India in terms of the access to Central Asia through the Chabahar port, thus balancing the Gwadar port or the China–Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC). An assertive Iran after the deal might see a worried and anxious Saudi Arabia and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) presenting Pakistan with power balance challenges in the Persian Gulf. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Review of the Middle East SAGE

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action: Impacts on Pakistan–Iran Relations

Contemporary Review of the Middle East , Volume 3 (1): 18 – Mar 1, 2016

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References (76)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2016 SAGE Publications India Private Limited
ISSN
2347-7989
eISSN
2349-0055
DOI
10.1177/2347798916632325
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) will impact the Iran–Pakistan relations in many ways including the prospects of the Pakistan–Iran gas pipeline and other energy issues which had earlier been halted due to sanctions and the American pressure. Trade will become flexible, and Pakistan will import oil and export rice, but there are issues than those pertaining to the sanctions which had governed bilateral trade that will continue to be an irritant. Iran would be more assertive on Balochistan, especially on the Jundullah and other rebel groups entering into its Sistan–Baluchistan province from Pakistan. Moreover, Afghanistan will present its own challenges as Iran might have more in common with India in terms of the access to Central Asia through the Chabahar port, thus balancing the Gwadar port or the China–Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC). An assertive Iran after the deal might see a worried and anxious Saudi Arabia and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) presenting Pakistan with power balance challenges in the Persian Gulf.

Journal

Contemporary Review of the Middle EastSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2016

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