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The mountain in the city: social uses and transformations of a natural landform in urban space

The mountain in the city: social uses and transformations of a natural landform in urban space T HE MOUNTAIN IN THE CITY: SOCIAL USES AND TRANSFORMATIONS OF A NATURAL LANDFORM IN URBAN SPACE Bernard Debarbieux ount Royal emerges with a few other hills from the remarkably flat, wide M plain of Montreal. Its height is modest (200 m); in modern parlance, it is a ‘hill’. But such topographical categories were adopted only in the eighteenth centur y. Before that time Montrealers, probably struck by the sharp contrast between Mount Royal and its environs, by its steep slopes, by the rocky section at its summit, got used to calling the place ‘the Mountain’. Subsequently and despite its odd terminology, Mount Royal remained ‘the Mountain’. A very strong and specific bond has developed over the centuries between Montrealers and the Mountain. During that time, Mount Royal has been deeply transformed. Such transformations have taken place with attention to its personnality, to the specific place it occupies in the landscape and to the imagination of local peo- ple. Today, four cemeteries, a large and beautiful park, monumental buildings and wealthy residential districts are gathered there. Together with the landform itself, these compose a landscape dramatically different from its surroundings. Mount Royal’s natural specificity has not only been kept http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecumene SAGE

The mountain in the city: social uses and transformations of a natural landform in urban space

Ecumene , Volume 5 (4): 33 – Oct 1, 1998

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References (35)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0967-4608
DOI
10.1177/096746089800500402
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

T HE MOUNTAIN IN THE CITY: SOCIAL USES AND TRANSFORMATIONS OF A NATURAL LANDFORM IN URBAN SPACE Bernard Debarbieux ount Royal emerges with a few other hills from the remarkably flat, wide M plain of Montreal. Its height is modest (200 m); in modern parlance, it is a ‘hill’. But such topographical categories were adopted only in the eighteenth centur y. Before that time Montrealers, probably struck by the sharp contrast between Mount Royal and its environs, by its steep slopes, by the rocky section at its summit, got used to calling the place ‘the Mountain’. Subsequently and despite its odd terminology, Mount Royal remained ‘the Mountain’. A very strong and specific bond has developed over the centuries between Montrealers and the Mountain. During that time, Mount Royal has been deeply transformed. Such transformations have taken place with attention to its personnality, to the specific place it occupies in the landscape and to the imagination of local peo- ple. Today, four cemeteries, a large and beautiful park, monumental buildings and wealthy residential districts are gathered there. Together with the landform itself, these compose a landscape dramatically different from its surroundings. Mount Royal’s natural specificity has not only been kept

Journal

EcumeneSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 1998

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