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The Walking of Words: Third World feminism and the reimagining of resistance by indigenous communities

The Walking of Words: Third World feminism and the reimagining of resistance by indigenous... In 2008 the Association of Indigenous Councils of Northern Cauca (ACIN) sent a letter to U.S. president Barack Obama regarding the atrocities committed against the indigenous communities in Colombia. The letter addressed how rights have been stripped from the indigenous communities. However, the letter represented more than documented accounts of injustice. The letter represented the demystification of traditional political representations and processes. This article uses Third World feminism as a theoretical framework to explore how indigenous social movements are making visible “a right” and “collective rights” from an alternative source. It seeks to reconceptualize resistance and revolution outside universal ideologies of liberation by examining how indigenous uprisings represent a new form of resistance, one that is deeply embedded in historical consciousnesses of indigenous communities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples SAGE

The Walking of Words: Third World feminism and the reimagining of resistance by indigenous communities

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References (51)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2014 Ngä Pae o te Märamatanga
ISSN
1177-1801
eISSN
1174-1740
DOI
10.1177/117718011401000303
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 2008 the Association of Indigenous Councils of Northern Cauca (ACIN) sent a letter to U.S. president Barack Obama regarding the atrocities committed against the indigenous communities in Colombia. The letter addressed how rights have been stripped from the indigenous communities. However, the letter represented more than documented accounts of injustice. The letter represented the demystification of traditional political representations and processes. This article uses Third World feminism as a theoretical framework to explore how indigenous social movements are making visible “a right” and “collective rights” from an alternative source. It seeks to reconceptualize resistance and revolution outside universal ideologies of liberation by examining how indigenous uprisings represent a new form of resistance, one that is deeply embedded in historical consciousnesses of indigenous communities.

Journal

AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous PeoplesSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2014

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