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Travel Behavior as Function of Accessibility, Land Use Mixing, and Land Use Balance: Evidence from San Francisco Bay Area

Travel Behavior as Function of Accessibility, Land Use Mixing, and Land Use Balance: Evidence... The relative significance and influence of a variety of measures of urban form on household vehicle kilometers traveled, automobile ownership, and mode choice were investigated. The travel data came from the 1990 San Francisco Bay Area travel surveys, and the land use data were largely constructed from hectare-level descriptions provided by the Association of Bay Area Governments. After demographic characteristics were controlled for, the measures of accessibility, land use mixing, and land use balance—computed for trip-makers’ home neighborhoods and at trip ends—proved to be highly statistically significant and influential in their impact on all measures of travel behavior. In many cases, balance, mix, and accessibility were found to be more relevant (as measured by elasticities) than several household and traveler characteristics that often form a basis for travel behavior prediction. In contrast, under all but the vehicle ownership models, the impact of density was negligible after accessibility was controlled. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transportation Research Record SAGE

Travel Behavior as Function of Accessibility, Land Use Mixing, and Land Use Balance: Evidence from San Francisco Bay Area

Transportation Research Record , Volume 1607 (1): 10 – Jan 1, 1997

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References (38)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1997 National Academy of Sciences
ISSN
0361-1981
eISSN
2169-4052
DOI
10.3141/1607-16
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The relative significance and influence of a variety of measures of urban form on household vehicle kilometers traveled, automobile ownership, and mode choice were investigated. The travel data came from the 1990 San Francisco Bay Area travel surveys, and the land use data were largely constructed from hectare-level descriptions provided by the Association of Bay Area Governments. After demographic characteristics were controlled for, the measures of accessibility, land use mixing, and land use balance—computed for trip-makers’ home neighborhoods and at trip ends—proved to be highly statistically significant and influential in their impact on all measures of travel behavior. In many cases, balance, mix, and accessibility were found to be more relevant (as measured by elasticities) than several household and traveler characteristics that often form a basis for travel behavior prediction. In contrast, under all but the vehicle ownership models, the impact of density was negligible after accessibility was controlled.

Journal

Transportation Research RecordSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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