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Understanding Graduate Women's Reentry Experiences

Understanding Graduate Women's Reentry Experiences This multiple case study describes the experiences of reentry women in psychology doctoral programs at a major Midwestern research university and illustrates the usefulness of the qualitative case-study method in exploring women's experiences. Semistructured interviews were conducted with four women who were purposefully selected as information-rich participants. Observations and informal interviews were also conducted over a period of up to 2 1/2 years. Eight themes emerged from the data and have been labeled: the decision to return, expectations versus reality, measuring up, frustrations and difficulties, changing family relationships, the necessity of organization, “do it and get on with life,” and rewards. This article illustrates that case-study research can be a powerful tool for feminist researchers to document women's experiences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology of Women Quarterly SAGE

Understanding Graduate Women's Reentry Experiences

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References (41)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1999 Society for the Psychology of Women
ISSN
0361-6843
eISSN
1471-6402
DOI
10.1111/j.1471-6402.1999.tb00364.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This multiple case study describes the experiences of reentry women in psychology doctoral programs at a major Midwestern research university and illustrates the usefulness of the qualitative case-study method in exploring women's experiences. Semistructured interviews were conducted with four women who were purposefully selected as information-rich participants. Observations and informal interviews were also conducted over a period of up to 2 1/2 years. Eight themes emerged from the data and have been labeled: the decision to return, expectations versus reality, measuring up, frustrations and difficulties, changing family relationships, the necessity of organization, “do it and get on with life,” and rewards. This article illustrates that case-study research can be a powerful tool for feminist researchers to document women's experiences.

Journal

Psychology of Women QuarterlySAGE

Published: Jun 1, 1999

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