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Value Orientations, Gender, and Environmental Concern

Value Orientations, Gender, and Environmental Concern A social-psychological model is developed to examine the proposition that environmentalism represents a new way of thinking. It presumes that action in support of environmental quality may derive from any of three value orientations: egoistic, social-altruistic, or biospheric, and that gender may be implicated in the relation between these orientations and behavior. Behavioral intentions are modeled as the sum across values of the strength of a value times the strength of beliefs about the consequences of environmental conditions for valued objects. Evidence from a survey of 349 college students shows that beliefs about consequences for each type of valued object independently predict willingness to take political action, but only beliefs about consequences for self reliably predict willingness to pay through taxes. This result is consistent with other recent findings from contingent valuation surveys. Women have stronger beliefs than men about consequences for self, others, and the biosphere, but there is no gender difference in the strength of value orientations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Behavior SAGE

Value Orientations, Gender, and Environmental Concern

Environment and Behavior , Volume 25 (5): 27 – Sep 1, 1993

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References (75)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0013-9165
eISSN
1552-390X
DOI
10.1177/0013916593255002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A social-psychological model is developed to examine the proposition that environmentalism represents a new way of thinking. It presumes that action in support of environmental quality may derive from any of three value orientations: egoistic, social-altruistic, or biospheric, and that gender may be implicated in the relation between these orientations and behavior. Behavioral intentions are modeled as the sum across values of the strength of a value times the strength of beliefs about the consequences of environmental conditions for valued objects. Evidence from a survey of 349 college students shows that beliefs about consequences for each type of valued object independently predict willingness to take political action, but only beliefs about consequences for self reliably predict willingness to pay through taxes. This result is consistent with other recent findings from contingent valuation surveys. Women have stronger beliefs than men about consequences for self, others, and the biosphere, but there is no gender difference in the strength of value orientations.

Journal

Environment and BehaviorSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 1993

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