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What to Say When: Advertising Appeals in Evolving Markets

What to Say When: Advertising Appeals in Evolving Markets The authors study how ad cues affect consumer behavior in new versus well-established markets. The authors use theoretical insights from consumer information processing to argue that the same ad cues can have different effects on consumer behavior, depending on whether the market is new or old. The authors then test these hypotheses in the context of a toll-free referral service, using a highly disaggregate econometric model of advertising response. The results indicate that argument-based appeals, expert sources, and negatively framed messages are particularly effective in new markets. Emotion-based appeals and positively framed messages are more effective in older markets than in new markets. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Marketing Research SAGE

What to Say When: Advertising Appeals in Evolving Markets

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References (107)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2001 American Marketing Association
ISSN
0022-2437
eISSN
1547-7193
DOI
10.1509/jmkr.38.4.399.18908
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The authors study how ad cues affect consumer behavior in new versus well-established markets. The authors use theoretical insights from consumer information processing to argue that the same ad cues can have different effects on consumer behavior, depending on whether the market is new or old. The authors then test these hypotheses in the context of a toll-free referral service, using a highly disaggregate econometric model of advertising response. The results indicate that argument-based appeals, expert sources, and negatively framed messages are particularly effective in new markets. Emotion-based appeals and positively framed messages are more effective in older markets than in new markets.

Journal

Journal of Marketing ResearchSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2001

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