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Schwannoma with an uncommon anal location

Schwannoma with an uncommon anal location Schwannomas are slow‑growing mesenchymal neoplasms that arise from Schwann cells with low malignant potential. These uncommon neoplasms are nerve sheath tumors that arise at almost any anatomical site. The majority of schwannomas are benign, and few are malignant. The current study presents the rare case of an anal schwannoma that was successfully treated by surgery; there are few such cases previously reported in the literature. The patient was admitted to hospital following the identification of a mass incidentally.The tumor was so large that it compressed the tissue around it, although no symptoms were caused. The pre‑operative clinical diagnosis was inconclusive in this case, and a final diagnosis was established based on radiographic and histopathological examination. The current study aimed to provide a possible differential diagnosis for such anally-located masses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oncology Letters Spandidos Publications

Schwannoma with an uncommon anal location

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Publisher
Spandidos Publications
Copyright
Copyright © Spandidos Publications
ISSN
1792-1074
eISSN
1792-1082
DOI
10.3892/ol.2014.2459
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Schwannomas are slow‑growing mesenchymal neoplasms that arise from Schwann cells with low malignant potential. These uncommon neoplasms are nerve sheath tumors that arise at almost any anatomical site. The majority of schwannomas are benign, and few are malignant. The current study presents the rare case of an anal schwannoma that was successfully treated by surgery; there are few such cases previously reported in the literature. The patient was admitted to hospital following the identification of a mass incidentally.The tumor was so large that it compressed the tissue around it, although no symptoms were caused. The pre‑operative clinical diagnosis was inconclusive in this case, and a final diagnosis was established based on radiographic and histopathological examination. The current study aimed to provide a possible differential diagnosis for such anally-located masses.

Journal

Oncology LettersSpandidos Publications

Published: Nov 1, 2014

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