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A Foundational Principle for Quantum Mechanics

A Foundational Principle for Quantum Mechanics In contrast to the theories of relativity, quantum mechanics is not yet based on a generally accepted conceptual foundation. It is proposed here that the missing principle may be identified through the observation that all knowledge in physics has to be expressed in propositions and that therefore the most elementary system represents the truth value of one proposition, i.e., it carries just one bit of information. Therefore an elementary system can only give a definite result in one specific measurement. The irreducible randomness in other measurements is then a necessary consequence. For composite systems entanglement results if all possible information is exhausted in specifying joint properties of the constituents. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Foundations of Physics Springer Journals

A Foundational Principle for Quantum Mechanics

Foundations of Physics , Volume 29 (4) – Oct 20, 2004

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References (27)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Physics; History and Philosophical Foundations of Physics; Quantum Physics; Classical and Quantum Gravitation, Relativity Theory; Statistical Physics and Dynamical Systems; Classical Mechanics; Philosophy of Science
ISSN
0015-9018
eISSN
1572-9516
DOI
10.1023/A:1018820410908
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In contrast to the theories of relativity, quantum mechanics is not yet based on a generally accepted conceptual foundation. It is proposed here that the missing principle may be identified through the observation that all knowledge in physics has to be expressed in propositions and that therefore the most elementary system represents the truth value of one proposition, i.e., it carries just one bit of information. Therefore an elementary system can only give a definite result in one specific measurement. The irreducible randomness in other measurements is then a necessary consequence. For composite systems entanglement results if all possible information is exhausted in specifying joint properties of the constituents.

Journal

Foundations of PhysicsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 20, 2004

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