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A History of Self-Harm in BritainIntroduction: Self-Harm from Social Setting to Neurobiology

A History of Self-Harm in Britain: Introduction: Self-Harm from Social Setting to Neurobiology [Self-harm is a significant mental health issue in the twenty-first century. The recorded rise in various behaviours, including deliberate self-cutting and self-burning, have been widely remarked upon and lamented.1 Eminent cultural historian Sander Gilman has recently written of a global ‘sharp public awareness of self-harm as a major mental health issue’.2 The behaviour is usually said to be motivated by a desire to regulate feelings of intolerable tension, sadness or emotional numbness, and is almost always reported to be ‘on the increase’; it is also often reported as a problem primarily affecting young women.3 Despite a steady stream of books and articles on this emotive subject from the 1980s onwards — from psychiatrists, social workers and sociologists among others — there remains little meaningful historical analysis of this phenomenon.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A History of Self-Harm in BritainIntroduction: Self-Harm from Social Setting to Neurobiology

Springer Journals — Jan 15, 2016

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and the Author(s) 2015
ISBN
978-1-137-54773-6
Pages
1 –39
DOI
10.1007/978-1-137-52962-6_1
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Self-harm is a significant mental health issue in the twenty-first century. The recorded rise in various behaviours, including deliberate self-cutting and self-burning, have been widely remarked upon and lamented.1 Eminent cultural historian Sander Gilman has recently written of a global ‘sharp public awareness of self-harm as a major mental health issue’.2 The behaviour is usually said to be motivated by a desire to regulate feelings of intolerable tension, sadness or emotional numbness, and is almost always reported to be ‘on the increase’; it is also often reported as a problem primarily affecting young women.3 Despite a steady stream of books and articles on this emotive subject from the 1980s onwards — from psychiatrists, social workers and sociologists among others — there remains little meaningful historical analysis of this phenomenon.]

Published: Jan 15, 2016

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