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A New Agenda For Football Crowd ManagementUnderstanding Risk in Football

A New Agenda For Football Crowd Management: Understanding Risk in Football [This chapter introduces and analyses six observational case studies derived from our most recent programme of work. The observations took place across the two years leading up to the outbreak of Covid-19 in 2020. The data was gathered during our ENABLE fieldwork and as such was to a large extent gathered using large teams of observers, some of whom were serving police officers, working alongside the authors. The anonymised case studies are used to draw out some of the key findings from this work as they relate to understanding and managing the dynamics of football crowds. Based on the evidence we gathered, we make several inter-related claims about the limitations of understanding ‘risk’ merely in terms of the disposition and fixed categorisation of fans. We point towards several other factors including the geography and topography of fan movement, alcohol legislation, weak intelligence, dialogue, and police accountability, all of which functioned to shape patterns of policing and interaction across the events we observed. We conclude that the evidence suggests it is far more effective to think of risk in situational and interactional terms and that to do so may help address the very heavy, and we assert often unnecessary, costs that both the public and the police are spending year-on-year on the policing of football across England and Wales.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A New Agenda For Football Crowd ManagementUnderstanding Risk in Football

Springer Journals — Dec 13, 2022

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG, part of Springer Nature 2022
ISBN
978-3-031-16297-8
Pages
235 –269
DOI
10.1007/978-3-031-16298-5_8
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This chapter introduces and analyses six observational case studies derived from our most recent programme of work. The observations took place across the two years leading up to the outbreak of Covid-19 in 2020. The data was gathered during our ENABLE fieldwork and as such was to a large extent gathered using large teams of observers, some of whom were serving police officers, working alongside the authors. The anonymised case studies are used to draw out some of the key findings from this work as they relate to understanding and managing the dynamics of football crowds. Based on the evidence we gathered, we make several inter-related claims about the limitations of understanding ‘risk’ merely in terms of the disposition and fixed categorisation of fans. We point towards several other factors including the geography and topography of fan movement, alcohol legislation, weak intelligence, dialogue, and police accountability, all of which functioned to shape patterns of policing and interaction across the events we observed. We conclude that the evidence suggests it is far more effective to think of risk in situational and interactional terms and that to do so may help address the very heavy, and we assert often unnecessary, costs that both the public and the police are spending year-on-year on the policing of football across England and Wales.]

Published: Dec 13, 2022

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