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A Political History of the Two IrelandsParallel universes: minority identities, 1921–60

A Political History of the Two Irelands: Parallel universes: minority identities, 1921–60 [The political changes in Ireland of 1921–22 meant not only the establishment of new polities in Ireland but also the creation of two important minorities. The outcome of these arrangements left a Protestant and predominantly unionist minority in the Irish Free State and a Catholic and very largely nationalist minority in Northern Ireland, both in states not of their own choosing. The subsequent fate of these minorities has been the subject of considerable debate among both historians and political commentators, past and present. In this comparative study of the two groups, we seek first to describe the position in which the two minorities found themselves after 1921. How did they respond to their novel and unwanted situations and what were the immediate consequences? Next, the political and social fortunes of these minorities over the following half century must be investigated. Attention focuses then on some key aspects of both communities. What can we say about the particular identity of these two important minorities? How did their identities relate to the mainstream identities in each state? From this study it may be possible to arrive at a better judgement about their treatment and fate.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Political History of the Two IrelandsParallel universes: minority identities, 1921–60

Springer Journals — Oct 3, 2015

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2012
ISBN
978-0-230-36147-8
Pages
44 –85
DOI
10.1057/9780230363403_2
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The political changes in Ireland of 1921–22 meant not only the establishment of new polities in Ireland but also the creation of two important minorities. The outcome of these arrangements left a Protestant and predominantly unionist minority in the Irish Free State and a Catholic and very largely nationalist minority in Northern Ireland, both in states not of their own choosing. The subsequent fate of these minorities has been the subject of considerable debate among both historians and political commentators, past and present. In this comparative study of the two groups, we seek first to describe the position in which the two minorities found themselves after 1921. How did they respond to their novel and unwanted situations and what were the immediate consequences? Next, the political and social fortunes of these minorities over the following half century must be investigated. Attention focuses then on some key aspects of both communities. What can we say about the particular identity of these two important minorities? How did their identities relate to the mainstream identities in each state? From this study it may be possible to arrive at a better judgement about their treatment and fate.]

Published: Oct 3, 2015

Keywords: Irish Government; Catholic Church; Minority Identity; Mixed Marriage; Catholic Bishop

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