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A Subtle and Mysterious MachineThree Anatomic Lectures (1683): Ways of Knowing and the Anatomical Body

A Subtle and Mysterious Machine: Three Anatomic Lectures (1683): Ways of Knowing and the... CHAPTER VII THREE ANATOMIC LECTURES (1683): WAYS OF KNOWING AND THE ANATOMICAL BODY Having considered Enquiries, as an example of Charleton’s writing after his experimental experience at the Royal Society, I now turn to the final of the three medical texts under scrutiny. Three Anatomic Lectures (hereafter Lectures) was the physician’s penultimate publication. Lectures responded to the Neapolitan anatomist Giovanni Alfonso Borelli (1608-1679), whose De motu animalium had recently been published. As a modified translation of Borelli, Lectures allows us a special insight into how the English physician selected and altered material for his audience. By examining where and how he deviated from the Neapolitan’s presentation, we gain insight into Charleton’s own epistemological emphases in the investigation of the heart. For example, Lectures deviated from Borelli’s text in the addition of extended analogies, and the omission of numer- ous physical and mechanical demonstrations. Such alterations can suggest what Charleton saw as persuasive presentation of the material to his English audi- ence, and also his preference for analogic forms of demonstration over others. In addition, of course, Borelli had mathematical training that Charleton lacked. This chapter discusses further the questions of identity and epistemology devel- oped in the preceding chapters. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Subtle and Mysterious MachineThree Anatomic Lectures (1683): Ways of Knowing and the Anatomical Body

Part of the Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Book Series (volume 18)
Editors: Booth, Emily
Springer Journals — Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer 2005
ISBN
978-1-4020-3377-3
Pages
178 –215
DOI
10.1007/1-4020-3378-8_7
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTER VII THREE ANATOMIC LECTURES (1683): WAYS OF KNOWING AND THE ANATOMICAL BODY Having considered Enquiries, as an example of Charleton’s writing after his experimental experience at the Royal Society, I now turn to the final of the three medical texts under scrutiny. Three Anatomic Lectures (hereafter Lectures) was the physician’s penultimate publication. Lectures responded to the Neapolitan anatomist Giovanni Alfonso Borelli (1608-1679), whose De motu animalium had recently been published. As a modified translation of Borelli, Lectures allows us a special insight into how the English physician selected and altered material for his audience. By examining where and how he deviated from the Neapolitan’s presentation, we gain insight into Charleton’s own epistemological emphases in the investigation of the heart. For example, Lectures deviated from Borelli’s text in the addition of extended analogies, and the omission of numer- ous physical and mechanical demonstrations. Such alterations can suggest what Charleton saw as persuasive presentation of the material to his English audi- ence, and also his preference for analogic forms of demonstration over others. In addition, of course, Borelli had mathematical training that Charleton lacked. This chapter discusses further the questions of identity and epistemology devel- oped in the preceding chapters.

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: Natural Philosopher; Cardiac Nerve; Animal Spirit; English Physician; Natural Knowledge

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