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A synaptic model of memory: long-term potentiation in the hippocampus

A synaptic model of memory: long-term potentiation in the hippocampus Long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus is the primary experimental model for investigating the synaptic basis of learning and memory in vertebrates. The best understood form of long-term potentiation is induced by the activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor complex. This subtype of glutamate receptor endows long-term potentiation with Hebbian characteristics, and allows electrical events at the postsynaptic membrane to be transduced into chemical signals which, in turn, are thought to activate both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms to generate a persistent increase in synaptic strength. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

A synaptic model of memory: long-term potentiation in the hippocampus

Nature , Volume 361 (6407) – Jan 7, 1993

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References (168)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/361031a0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus is the primary experimental model for investigating the synaptic basis of learning and memory in vertebrates. The best understood form of long-term potentiation is induced by the activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor complex. This subtype of glutamate receptor endows long-term potentiation with Hebbian characteristics, and allows electrical events at the postsynaptic membrane to be transduced into chemical signals which, in turn, are thought to activate both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms to generate a persistent increase in synaptic strength.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 7, 1993

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