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A Victorian Educational Pioneer’s Evangelicalism, Leadership, and Love Difficult Relations, 1882–1891

A Victorian Educational Pioneer’s Evangelicalism, Leadership, and Love : Difficult Relations,... [Much has been written on how the cause, or the British nineteenth-century movement towards women’s higher learning, dramatically altered women’s lives. However, virtually nothing exists on how emergent professional educators coped with their new occupations within a patriarchal society. Chapter 4 addresses this lack, showcasing microhistorical events in 1882, 1884, and 1891 that illustrate Maynard’s difficult Mistress-ship at Westfield College under her chiefly male administrators. More surprising, however, is Maynard’s toxic relationship with a female Westfield Council member called Frances (Fanny) Metcalfe. In fact, their ongoing bitter relations expose heretofore unknown rivalry among the first female professionals. Unfortunately, their hostilities led Westfield Council to harshly discipline and ostracize Maynard for fifteen years, which explains how Victorians attributed professional competitiveness to masculinity.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Victorian Educational Pioneer’s Evangelicalism, Leadership, and Love Difficult Relations, 1882–1891

Springer Journals — Nov 16, 2022

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2023
ISBN
978-3-031-13998-7
Pages
73 –98
DOI
10.1007/978-3-031-13999-4_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Much has been written on how the cause, or the British nineteenth-century movement towards women’s higher learning, dramatically altered women’s lives. However, virtually nothing exists on how emergent professional educators coped with their new occupations within a patriarchal society. Chapter 4 addresses this lack, showcasing microhistorical events in 1882, 1884, and 1891 that illustrate Maynard’s difficult Mistress-ship at Westfield College under her chiefly male administrators. More surprising, however, is Maynard’s toxic relationship with a female Westfield Council member called Frances (Fanny) Metcalfe. In fact, their ongoing bitter relations expose heretofore unknown rivalry among the first female professionals. Unfortunately, their hostilities led Westfield Council to harshly discipline and ostracize Maynard for fifteen years, which explains how Victorians attributed professional competitiveness to masculinity.]

Published: Nov 16, 2022

Keywords: The Cause; Clues and Innuendos; Female Professionalism; Female–female power

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