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A Visual Approach for Green CriminologyWays of Seeing the Elephant in the Room: Images and Words

A Visual Approach for Green Criminology: Ways of Seeing the Elephant in the Room: Images and Words [In this chapter, I describe how photo elicitation can serve as a new source of qualitative data in environmental research and how it is crucial in promoting narratives about social perceptions of contamination. I also explain how photographs are decisive in becoming a reflexive and collaborative “bridge” between subjects and researchers. Furthermore, I suggest that this approach helps (1) to investigate the social perceptions of some transformations of the territory—often highly dramatic, as in the case of polluting plants built close to a town—introduced within a certain socio-environmental context in the course of time; and (2) to place these perceptions within the cultural, symbolical and natural worlds inhabited by the social actors, recognizing the active role of these actors in the construction of their unique experiences.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Visual Approach for Green CriminologyWays of Seeing the Elephant in the Room: Images and Words

Part of the Palgrave Studies in Green Criminology Book Series
Springer Journals — Oct 15, 2016

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016. The author(s) has/have asserted their right(s) to be identified as the author(s) of this work in accordance with the Copyright, Design and Patents Act 1988
ISBN
978-1-137-54667-8
Pages
51 –77
DOI
10.1057/978-1-137-54668-5_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In this chapter, I describe how photo elicitation can serve as a new source of qualitative data in environmental research and how it is crucial in promoting narratives about social perceptions of contamination. I also explain how photographs are decisive in becoming a reflexive and collaborative “bridge” between subjects and researchers. Furthermore, I suggest that this approach helps (1) to investigate the social perceptions of some transformations of the territory—often highly dramatic, as in the case of polluting plants built close to a town—introduced within a certain socio-environmental context in the course of time; and (2) to place these perceptions within the cultural, symbolical and natural worlds inhabited by the social actors, recognizing the active role of these actors in the construction of their unique experiences.]

Published: Oct 15, 2016

Keywords: Ways of seeing; Photo elicitation; Photographic collage; Social perception; Environmental victimization; Qualitative data

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