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Advances in Physarum MachinesOn the Memristive Properties of Slime Mould

Advances in Physarum Machines: On the Memristive Properties of Slime Mould [Physarum polycephalum has been shown to be a biological computer, capable of solving problems through morphological computation. We present laboratory experiments where Physarum was investigated as a component of electronic or wet-ware computers. We find that I-T\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$$I-T$$\end{document} electronic signals consistent in time-scale with shuttle transport can be recorded with a sensitive Keithley electrometer. The memristor is a novel non-linear stateful resistor with great promise in neuromorphic computing. We demonstrate that Physarum gives I-V\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$$I-V$$\end{document} curves consistent with a memristor and that this response is located in the living cytosol part of the organism (as opposed to the gel outer-body or slime layer). We model the Physarum as an active memristor (a memristor combined with a battery), where the living Physarum metabolism provides energy.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Advances in Physarum MachinesOn the Memristive Properties of Slime Mould

Part of the Emergence, Complexity and Computation Book Series (volume 21)
Editors: Adamatzky, Andrew

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016
ISBN
978-3-319-26661-9
Pages
75 –90
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-26662-6_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Physarum polycephalum has been shown to be a biological computer, capable of solving problems through morphological computation. We present laboratory experiments where Physarum was investigated as a component of electronic or wet-ware computers. We find that I-T\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$$I-T$$\end{document} electronic signals consistent in time-scale with shuttle transport can be recorded with a sensitive Keithley electrometer. The memristor is a novel non-linear stateful resistor with great promise in neuromorphic computing. We demonstrate that Physarum gives I-V\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$$I-V$$\end{document} curves consistent with a memristor and that this response is located in the living cytosol part of the organism (as opposed to the gel outer-body or slime layer). We model the Physarum as an active memristor (a memristor combined with a battery), where the living Physarum metabolism provides energy.]

Published: Jan 10, 2016

Keywords: Voltage Range; Tube Length; Slime Mould; Electrode Separation; Memristive Device

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