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An Iterative Choice Approach to Valuing Clean Lakes, Rivers, and Streams

An Iterative Choice Approach to Valuing Clean Lakes, Rivers, and Streams This article introduces an iterative choice procedure for valuing inland water quality. This approach breaks up the valuation into a series of component tasks. The water quality ladder approach is not valid empirically. Consequently, respondents in Colorado and North Carolina assessed the value of making water quality rated “good” by EPA, which has a value of $22.40 per additional percent improvement. Nonuse and probabilistic use are highly valued. The results also indicate how water quality valuations differ for aquatic environment, edible fish, and swimming, as well as for water that is cloudy, smelly, or polluted by toxics. Minorities are particularly likely to rely upon monitorable water quality attributes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Risk and Uncertainty Springer Journals

An Iterative Choice Approach to Valuing Clean Lakes, Rivers, and Streams

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References (15)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Economics; Economic Theory/Quantitative Economics/Mathematical Methods; Microeconomics; Operation Research/Decision Theory; Environmental Economics
ISSN
0895-5646
eISSN
1573-0476
DOI
10.1023/A:1026565225801
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article introduces an iterative choice procedure for valuing inland water quality. This approach breaks up the valuation into a series of component tasks. The water quality ladder approach is not valid empirically. Consequently, respondents in Colorado and North Carolina assessed the value of making water quality rated “good” by EPA, which has a value of $22.40 per additional percent improvement. Nonuse and probabilistic use are highly valued. The results also indicate how water quality valuations differ for aquatic environment, edible fish, and swimming, as well as for water that is cloudy, smelly, or polluted by toxics. Minorities are particularly likely to rely upon monitorable water quality attributes.

Journal

Journal of Risk and UncertaintySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

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