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Association between Plant Canopies and the Spatial Patterns of Infiltration in Shrubland and Grassland of the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico

Association between Plant Canopies and the Spatial Patterns of Infiltration in Shrubland and... Ecosystems (2003) 6: 185–196 DOI: 10.1007/s10021-002-0210-9 ECOSYSTEMS © 2003 Springer-Verlag Association between Plant Canopies and the Spatial Patterns of Infiltration in Shrubland and Grassland of the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico Eric W. Bhark and Eric E. Small* Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA ABSTRACT Shrubs have invaded extensive areas of grassland in terspaces. Canopies are oases where soil moisture is the southwestern United States. The zones of nutri- higher than in the surrounding areas. However, infil- ent-rich soil found beneath plant canopies, referred to tration is not greater beneath canopies when surface as “islands of fertility,” are more intense and spaced runoff is limited. In the shrubland, the canopy–in- farther apart in shrubland than in grassland. This dif- terspace infiltration ratio increases as storm size, and ference in the spatial pattern of soil nutrients may therefore runoff, increases. This relationship also ex- reinforce shrub invasion. Changes in water availabil- ists in the grassland, but it is not as strong or clear. The ity in the soil could also influence shrub invasion. magnitude of spatial variability of infiltration is similar Here we compare the spatial patterns of infiltration, in shrubland and grassland. In http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecosystems Springer Journals

Association between Plant Canopies and the Spatial Patterns of Infiltration in Shrubland and Grassland of the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico

Ecosystems , Volume 6 (2) – Mar 1, 2003

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References (36)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences; Zoology; Environmental Management; Geoecology/Natural Processes; Hydrology/Water Resources
ISSN
1432-9840
DOI
10.1007/s10021-002-0210-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ecosystems (2003) 6: 185–196 DOI: 10.1007/s10021-002-0210-9 ECOSYSTEMS © 2003 Springer-Verlag Association between Plant Canopies and the Spatial Patterns of Infiltration in Shrubland and Grassland of the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico Eric W. Bhark and Eric E. Small* Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA ABSTRACT Shrubs have invaded extensive areas of grassland in terspaces. Canopies are oases where soil moisture is the southwestern United States. The zones of nutri- higher than in the surrounding areas. However, infil- ent-rich soil found beneath plant canopies, referred to tration is not greater beneath canopies when surface as “islands of fertility,” are more intense and spaced runoff is limited. In the shrubland, the canopy–in- farther apart in shrubland than in grassland. This dif- terspace infiltration ratio increases as storm size, and ference in the spatial pattern of soil nutrients may therefore runoff, increases. This relationship also ex- reinforce shrub invasion. Changes in water availabil- ists in the grassland, but it is not as strong or clear. The ity in the soil could also influence shrub invasion. magnitude of spatial variability of infiltration is similar Here we compare the spatial patterns of infiltration, in shrubland and grassland. In

Journal

EcosystemsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 2003

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