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Autophagy in infection, inflammation and immunity

Autophagy in infection, inflammation and immunity Autophagy is a fundamental eukaryotic homeostatic pathway that affects innate and adaptive immunity. Autophagic responses are integrated with pattern recognition receptor and cytokine signalling. Autophagic receptors, termed sequestosome 1-like receptors, target intracellular microorganisms for autophagy via ubiquitin and galectin tags, and they represent a new class of pattern recognition receptors. Intracellular pathogens have evolved elaborate strategies to prevent, neutralize or commandeer autophagy to support their own survival. Autophagy is a potent anti-inflammatory process that inhibits inflammasome activation and that modulates type I interferon responses. Autophagy affects the secretion of inflammatory and antimicrobial mediators. Autophagy enhances conventional phagosome maturation, affects antigen presentation, and influences T cell homeostasis and T helper cell polarization. Genetic predisposition and physiological links exist between autophagy and infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in humans. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Immunology Springer Journals

Autophagy in infection, inflammation and immunity

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References (168)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Immunology
ISSN
1474-1733
eISSN
1474-1741
DOI
10.1038/nri3532
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Autophagy is a fundamental eukaryotic homeostatic pathway that affects innate and adaptive immunity. Autophagic responses are integrated with pattern recognition receptor and cytokine signalling. Autophagic receptors, termed sequestosome 1-like receptors, target intracellular microorganisms for autophagy via ubiquitin and galectin tags, and they represent a new class of pattern recognition receptors. Intracellular pathogens have evolved elaborate strategies to prevent, neutralize or commandeer autophagy to support their own survival. Autophagy is a potent anti-inflammatory process that inhibits inflammasome activation and that modulates type I interferon responses. Autophagy affects the secretion of inflammatory and antimicrobial mediators. Autophagy enhances conventional phagosome maturation, affects antigen presentation, and influences T cell homeostasis and T helper cell polarization. Genetic predisposition and physiological links exist between autophagy and infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in humans.

Journal

Nature Reviews ImmunologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 25, 2013

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