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Biomarker evidence for green and purple sulphur bacteria in a stratified Palaeoproterozoic sea

Biomarker evidence for green and purple sulphur bacteria in a stratified Palaeoproterozoic sea Rising oxygen levels in the Earth's early atmosphere marked the end of a 2.5-billion-year period dominated by oceans with low levels of oxygen. But geochemical evidence suggests that for the following billion years the oceans remained largely devoid of oxygen. The discovery of molecular fossils (hydrocarbon biomarkers) in 1.6-billion-year-old sedimentary rocks from a marine basin in northern Australia now offers insights into the marine ecosystem at the time. The biomarkers record an anoxic and sulphidic world hostile to to many forms of life but supporting blooms of sulphide-breathing green and purple bacteria. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

Biomarker evidence for green and purple sulphur bacteria in a stratified Palaeoproterozoic sea

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References (35)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/nature04068
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rising oxygen levels in the Earth's early atmosphere marked the end of a 2.5-billion-year period dominated by oceans with low levels of oxygen. But geochemical evidence suggests that for the following billion years the oceans remained largely devoid of oxygen. The discovery of molecular fossils (hydrocarbon biomarkers) in 1.6-billion-year-old sedimentary rocks from a marine basin in northern Australia now offers insights into the marine ecosystem at the time. The biomarkers record an anoxic and sulphidic world hostile to to many forms of life but supporting blooms of sulphide-breathing green and purple bacteria.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 6, 2005

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