Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cell Reactions Following Acute Brain Injury: A Review

Cell Reactions Following Acute Brain Injury: A Review The proliferative behavior of glia following a cerebral stab wound in adult rats is reviewed. Proliferation was determined by both PCNA and [3H]thymidine labeling. Microglia were the first cells to divide and constituted the bulk of dividing cells. Both ramified and ameboid microglia divided. A smaller number of astrocytes entered the cell cycle a day later and were shown to derive from differentiated reactive cells. No differentiated oligodendroglia were labeled by thymidine, although a small number of dividing immature oligodendroglia could be detected in cultures of cells labeled in vivo. Recent studies of the properties of oligodendroglial precursors in brain repair mechanisms are discussed. The results so far support our conclusion that differentiated oligodendrocytes do not divide. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurochemical Research Springer Journals

Cell Reactions Following Acute Brain Injury: A Review

Neurochemical Research , Volume 24 (2) – Sep 30, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/cell-reactions-following-acute-brain-injury-a-review-hUgjigO2Xq

References (48)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0364-3190
eISSN
1573-6903
DOI
10.1023/A:1022505903312
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The proliferative behavior of glia following a cerebral stab wound in adult rats is reviewed. Proliferation was determined by both PCNA and [3H]thymidine labeling. Microglia were the first cells to divide and constituted the bulk of dividing cells. Both ramified and ameboid microglia divided. A smaller number of astrocytes entered the cell cycle a day later and were shown to derive from differentiated reactive cells. No differentiated oligodendroglia were labeled by thymidine, although a small number of dividing immature oligodendroglia could be detected in cultures of cells labeled in vivo. Recent studies of the properties of oligodendroglial precursors in brain repair mechanisms are discussed. The results so far support our conclusion that differentiated oligodendrocytes do not divide.

Journal

Neurochemical ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 30, 2004

There are no references for this article.