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Chinese CapitalismsThe “Spirit” of Capitalism in China: Contemporary Meanings of Weber’s Thought

Chinese Capitalisms: The “Spirit” of Capitalism in China: Contemporary Meanings of Weber’s Thought [China’s Property Law was passed on March 16, 2007, in the Fifth Session of the Tenth National People’s Congress (NPC). Among the 2889 representatives in attendance, 2799 cast their votes in favor of the bill, thus putting an end to a debate that has lasted for some 13 years. The Law provides a written recognition of the system of private property rights, and at the same time echoes the revision of Article 13 that was made during the 2004 constitutional reform, which states that “citizens’ legally owned private property is not to be infringed.” The question remains as to whether the legislative changes signify China’s wholesale retreat from socialism and move toward the adoption of the capitalist path. It may be that China’s institutional transition has a long way to go, and in view of the numerous unresolved problems, the passing of the property bill may well intensify political conflicts and social unrest.1] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Chinese CapitalismsThe “Spirit” of Capitalism in China: Contemporary Meanings of Weber’s Thought

Editors: Chu, Yin-wah
Chinese Capitalisms — Sep 29, 2015

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2010
ISBN
978-1-349-36637-8
Pages
19 –45
DOI
10.1057/9780230251359_2
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[China’s Property Law was passed on March 16, 2007, in the Fifth Session of the Tenth National People’s Congress (NPC). Among the 2889 representatives in attendance, 2799 cast their votes in favor of the bill, thus putting an end to a debate that has lasted for some 13 years. The Law provides a written recognition of the system of private property rights, and at the same time echoes the revision of Article 13 that was made during the 2004 constitutional reform, which states that “citizens’ legally owned private property is not to be infringed.” The question remains as to whether the legislative changes signify China’s wholesale retreat from socialism and move toward the adoption of the capitalist path. It may be that China’s institutional transition has a long way to go, and in view of the numerous unresolved problems, the passing of the property bill may well intensify political conflicts and social unrest.1]

Published: Sep 29, 2015

Keywords: Qing Dynasty; China Communist Party; Cultural Revolution; Confucian Ethic; Harmonious Society

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