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Chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology and ground-water ionicity: study based on Sri Lanka

Chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology and ground-water ionicity: study based on Sri Lanka High incidence of chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology (CKDU) in Sri Lanka is shown to correlate with the presence of irrigation works and rivers that bring-in ‘nonpoint source’ fertilizer runoff from intensely agricultural regions. We review previous attempts to link CKDU with As, Cd and other standard toxins. Those studies (e.g. the WHO-sponsored study), while providing a wealth of data, are inconclusive in regard to aetiology. Here, we present new proposals based on increased ionicity of drinking water due to fertilizer runoff into the river system, redox processes in the soil and features of ‘tank’-cascades and aquifers. The consequent chronic exposure to high ionicity in drinking water is proposed to debilitate the kidney via a Hofmeister-type (i.e. protein-denaturing) mechanism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Geochemistry and Health Springer Journals

Chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology and ground-water ionicity: study based on Sri Lanka

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References (56)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Environment; Environmental Health; Geochemistry; Terrestrial Pollution; Soil Science & Conservation; Environmental Chemistry; Public Health
ISSN
0269-4042
eISSN
1573-2983
DOI
10.1007/s10653-014-9641-4
pmid
25119535
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

High incidence of chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology (CKDU) in Sri Lanka is shown to correlate with the presence of irrigation works and rivers that bring-in ‘nonpoint source’ fertilizer runoff from intensely agricultural regions. We review previous attempts to link CKDU with As, Cd and other standard toxins. Those studies (e.g. the WHO-sponsored study), while providing a wealth of data, are inconclusive in regard to aetiology. Here, we present new proposals based on increased ionicity of drinking water due to fertilizer runoff into the river system, redox processes in the soil and features of ‘tank’-cascades and aquifers. The consequent chronic exposure to high ionicity in drinking water is proposed to debilitate the kidney via a Hofmeister-type (i.e. protein-denaturing) mechanism.

Journal

Environmental Geochemistry and HealthSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 14, 2014

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