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Climate change and Australian wheat yield

Climate change and Australian wheat yield Nicholls 1 reported that 30-50% of the increase in Australian wheat yields in the period 1952-92 resulted from climate change. He estimated a simple linear relationship where a 1°C fall in diurnal temperature range increased Australian wheat yield by 0.52 t ha−1. This effect, taken with the trend in diurnal range, accounted for 45% of the yield increase between 1952 and 1992. In an extended model with three climate variables, Nicholls found that changes in minimum temperature had had most impact on wheat yield and that rainfall change had contributed little. In our view, Nicholls's results need qualification and should be interpreted with caution. They are only estimates, and do not include standard errors to indicate their precision. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

Climate change and Australian wheat yield

Nature , Volume 391 (6666) – Jan 29, 1998

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References (1)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Macmillan Magazines Ltd.
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/35054
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nicholls 1 reported that 30-50% of the increase in Australian wheat yields in the period 1952-92 resulted from climate change. He estimated a simple linear relationship where a 1°C fall in diurnal temperature range increased Australian wheat yield by 0.52 t ha−1. This effect, taken with the trend in diurnal range, accounted for 45% of the yield increase between 1952 and 1992. In an extended model with three climate variables, Nicholls found that changes in minimum temperature had had most impact on wheat yield and that rainfall change had contributed little. In our view, Nicholls's results need qualification and should be interpreted with caution. They are only estimates, and do not include standard errors to indicate their precision.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 29, 1998

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