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Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Ranolazine

Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Ranolazine Ranolazine is a compound that is approved by the US FDA for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris in combination with amlodipine, β-adrenoceptor antagonists or nitrates, in patients who have not achieved an adequate response with other anti-anginals. The anti-anginal effect of ranolazine does not depend on changes in heart rate or blood pressure. It acts through different pharmacological mechanisms where inhibition of the late inward sodium current (reducing calcium overload and thereby left ventricular diastolic tension) is one plausible mechanism of reduced oxygen consumption. Initial studies used an oral solution or an immediate-release (IR) capsule, but subsequently an extended-release (ER) formulation was developed to allow for twice-daily administration with maintained efficacy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Pharmacokinetics Springer Journals

Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Ranolazine

Clinical Pharmacokinetics , Volume 45 (5) – Jan 8, 2013

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References (39)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Adis Data Information BV
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Pharmacotherapy; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Internal Medicine
ISSN
0312-5963
eISSN
1179-1926
DOI
10.2165/00003088-200645050-00003
pmid
16640453
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ranolazine is a compound that is approved by the US FDA for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris in combination with amlodipine, β-adrenoceptor antagonists or nitrates, in patients who have not achieved an adequate response with other anti-anginals. The anti-anginal effect of ranolazine does not depend on changes in heart rate or blood pressure. It acts through different pharmacological mechanisms where inhibition of the late inward sodium current (reducing calcium overload and thereby left ventricular diastolic tension) is one plausible mechanism of reduced oxygen consumption. Initial studies used an oral solution or an immediate-release (IR) capsule, but subsequently an extended-release (ER) formulation was developed to allow for twice-daily administration with maintained efficacy.

Journal

Clinical PharmacokineticsSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 8, 2013

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