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Commentary: integrating environmental DNA into applied ecological practice

Commentary: integrating environmental DNA into applied ecological practice Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods and technologies are increasingly being explored and applied in research studies and environmental monitoring. Although eDNA has some limitations, there is the potential for major advantages to using this method within a regulatory context for characterizing and assessing species, populations, communities, and whole ecosystems. This commentary explores some of the challenges and solutions to acceptance of eDNA methods by regulators and regulated communities as an option for environmental monitoring. Increased collaborative eDNA forums and eDNA studies among researchers, regulators, applied ecologists, and regulated communities would help delineate the benefits, limitations, and appropriate applications of eDNA methods. This could facilitate development of best practices and industry standards which could, in turn, lead to acceptance by regulators and regulated communities. Finally, opportunities for applying eDNA to complement or even improve conventional monitoring methods are illustrated using three examples of regulatory environmental monitoring studies for protecting species at risk. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences Springer Journals

Commentary: integrating environmental DNA into applied ecological practice

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References (31)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © AESS 2020
ISSN
2190-6483
eISSN
2190-6491
DOI
10.1007/s13412-020-00638-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods and technologies are increasingly being explored and applied in research studies and environmental monitoring. Although eDNA has some limitations, there is the potential for major advantages to using this method within a regulatory context for characterizing and assessing species, populations, communities, and whole ecosystems. This commentary explores some of the challenges and solutions to acceptance of eDNA methods by regulators and regulated communities as an option for environmental monitoring. Increased collaborative eDNA forums and eDNA studies among researchers, regulators, applied ecologists, and regulated communities would help delineate the benefits, limitations, and appropriate applications of eDNA methods. This could facilitate development of best practices and industry standards which could, in turn, lead to acceptance by regulators and regulated communities. Finally, opportunities for applying eDNA to complement or even improve conventional monitoring methods are illustrated using three examples of regulatory environmental monitoring studies for protecting species at risk.

Journal

Journal of Environmental Studies and SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 29, 2020

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