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Comorbidity as the dominant predictor of mortality after hip fracture surgeries

Comorbidity as the dominant predictor of mortality after hip fracture surgeries Summary The aim of this study was to investigate the association of surgical delay and comorbidities with the risk of mortality after hip fracture surgeries. We found that CCI was the dominant factor in predicting both short- and long-term mortality, and its effect is vital in the prognostication of survivorship. Introduction Hip fracture is a growing concern and a delay in surgery is often associated with a poorer outcome. We hypoth- esized that a higher Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) portends greater risk of mortality than a delay in surgery. Our aim was to investigate the associations of surgical delay and CCI with risk of mortality and to determine the dominant predictor. Methods This retrospective study examines hip fracture data from a large tertiary hospital in Singapore over the period January 2013 through December 2015. Data collected included age, gender, CCI, delay of surgery, fracture patterns, and the American Society of Anaesthesiologist (ASA) score. Post-operative outcomes analyzed included mortality at inpatient, at 30 and 90 days, and at 2 years. Results A total of 1004 patients with hip fractures were included in this study. Study mortality rates were 1.1% (n = 11) during in- hospital admission, 1.8% (n = 18) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Osteoporosis International Springer Journals

Comorbidity as the dominant predictor of mortality after hip fracture surgeries

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References (36)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Orthopedics; Endocrinology; Rheumatology
ISSN
0937-941X
eISSN
1433-2965
DOI
10.1007/s00198-019-05139-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary The aim of this study was to investigate the association of surgical delay and comorbidities with the risk of mortality after hip fracture surgeries. We found that CCI was the dominant factor in predicting both short- and long-term mortality, and its effect is vital in the prognostication of survivorship. Introduction Hip fracture is a growing concern and a delay in surgery is often associated with a poorer outcome. We hypoth- esized that a higher Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) portends greater risk of mortality than a delay in surgery. Our aim was to investigate the associations of surgical delay and CCI with risk of mortality and to determine the dominant predictor. Methods This retrospective study examines hip fracture data from a large tertiary hospital in Singapore over the period January 2013 through December 2015. Data collected included age, gender, CCI, delay of surgery, fracture patterns, and the American Society of Anaesthesiologist (ASA) score. Post-operative outcomes analyzed included mortality at inpatient, at 30 and 90 days, and at 2 years. Results A total of 1004 patients with hip fractures were included in this study. Study mortality rates were 1.1% (n = 11) during in- hospital admission, 1.8% (n = 18)

Journal

Osteoporosis InternationalSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 26, 2019

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