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Contain and Control: Wildfire Suppression Effectiveness at Incidents and Across Landscapes

Contain and Control: Wildfire Suppression Effectiveness at Incidents and Across Landscapes Purpose of Review Containing and controlling wildfire incidents is one of the main functions of fire management. Understanding how this can be done effectively and efficiently informs many of the preparatory activities undertaken by fire management agencies to limit the impact of wildfires. This second article within a two-part series summarizing the current understanding of wildfire suppression effectiveness details research undertaken at incident and landscape scales and discusses their motivations and implications. The series is concluded with a discussion of the major suppression effectiveness knowledge gaps at all scales with suggestions for addressing them. Recent Findings Research across incidents has been undertaken as case studies of specific events and economic analyses of productivity during the containment of large fires. Some recent case studies have demonstrated the benefits of fuel management for suppression effectiveness, while economic analyses have identified the contributions of different resource types to contain- ment and found that productivity models developed using non-wildfire data grossly overpredict operational productivity. Research at the landscape scale has identified the variables important for fire outcomes, such as initial attack success and the effectiveness of fuel management programs, and has also identified the benefits of suppression policy changes using long-term datasets. Summary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Forestry Reports Springer Journals

Contain and Control: Wildfire Suppression Effectiveness at Incidents and Across Landscapes

Current Forestry Reports , Volume 5 (1) – Feb 1, 2019

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References (152)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Subject
Environment; Sustainable Development; Environmental Management; Nature Conservation; Forestry; Forestry Management; Ecology
eISSN
2198-6436
DOI
10.1007/s40725-019-00085-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review Containing and controlling wildfire incidents is one of the main functions of fire management. Understanding how this can be done effectively and efficiently informs many of the preparatory activities undertaken by fire management agencies to limit the impact of wildfires. This second article within a two-part series summarizing the current understanding of wildfire suppression effectiveness details research undertaken at incident and landscape scales and discusses their motivations and implications. The series is concluded with a discussion of the major suppression effectiveness knowledge gaps at all scales with suggestions for addressing them. Recent Findings Research across incidents has been undertaken as case studies of specific events and economic analyses of productivity during the containment of large fires. Some recent case studies have demonstrated the benefits of fuel management for suppression effectiveness, while economic analyses have identified the contributions of different resource types to contain- ment and found that productivity models developed using non-wildfire data grossly overpredict operational productivity. Research at the landscape scale has identified the variables important for fire outcomes, such as initial attack success and the effectiveness of fuel management programs, and has also identified the benefits of suppression policy changes using long-term datasets. Summary

Journal

Current Forestry ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 2019

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