Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Current switching of resistive states in magnetoresistive manganites

Current switching of resistive states in magnetoresistive manganites Magnetoresistive devices (based on, for example, magnetic multilayers1) exhibit large changes in electrical resistance in response to a magnetic field, which has led to dramatic improvements in the data density and reading speed of magnetic recording systems. Manganese oxides having a perovskite structure (the so-called manganites) can exhibit a magnetoresistive response that is many orders of magnitude larger than that found for other materials, and there is therefore hope that these compounds might similarly be exploited for recording applications2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11. Here we show that the switching of resistive states in the manganites can be achieved not only by a magnetic field, but also by an electric field. For manganites of the form Pr1−xCaxMnO3, we find that an electrical current (and by implication a static electric field) triggers the collapse of the low-temperature, electrically insulating charge-ordered state to a metallic ferromagnetic state. We suggest that such a phenomenon could be exploited to pattern conducting ferromagnetic domains within an insulating antiferromagnetic matrix, and so provide a route for fabricating micrometre- or nanometre-scale electromagnets. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

Current switching of resistive states in magnetoresistive manganites

Nature , Volume 388 (6637) – Jul 3, 1997

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/current-switching-of-resistive-states-in-magnetoresistive-manganites-rlqDXjNNgr

References (25)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Macmillan Magazines Ltd. 1997
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/40363
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Magnetoresistive devices (based on, for example, magnetic multilayers1) exhibit large changes in electrical resistance in response to a magnetic field, which has led to dramatic improvements in the data density and reading speed of magnetic recording systems. Manganese oxides having a perovskite structure (the so-called manganites) can exhibit a magnetoresistive response that is many orders of magnitude larger than that found for other materials, and there is therefore hope that these compounds might similarly be exploited for recording applications2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11. Here we show that the switching of resistive states in the manganites can be achieved not only by a magnetic field, but also by an electric field. For manganites of the form Pr1−xCaxMnO3, we find that an electrical current (and by implication a static electric field) triggers the collapse of the low-temperature, electrically insulating charge-ordered state to a metallic ferromagnetic state. We suggest that such a phenomenon could be exploited to pattern conducting ferromagnetic domains within an insulating antiferromagnetic matrix, and so provide a route for fabricating micrometre- or nanometre-scale electromagnets.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 3, 1997

There are no references for this article.