Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cytokines in cancer pathogenesis and cancer therapy

Cytokines in cancer pathogenesis and cancer therapy Immune-cell infiltrates constitute a prominent component of the host response to cancer in some cases, but their functional significance remains incompletely understood. Cancer cells express antigens that can be recognized by both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Host-derived cytokines can suppress tumour formation by controlling infection, inflammation and immunity. Tumour cells can exploit host-derived cytokines to promote growth, increase resistance to apoptosis and foster dissemination. The systemic administration of cytokines can elicit antitumour effects, but the toxicities that are associated with this treatment often resemble a state of severe infection and can therefore be limiting. Tumour cells can be genetically modified to express particular cytokines that stimulate the host immune response, thereby acquiring the capacity to function as cancer vaccines. Antibody blockade of the CTLA-4 inhibitory receptor on T cells is a promising strategy to increase the potency of cancer vaccines, albeit with a risk of compromising tolerance to self-antigens. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Cancer Springer Journals

Cytokines in cancer pathogenesis and cancer therapy

Nature Reviews Cancer , Volume 4 (1) – Jan 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/cytokines-in-cancer-pathogenesis-and-cancer-therapy-anPg8eJHD1

References (141)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Cancer Research
ISSN
1474-175X
eISSN
1474-1768
DOI
10.1038/nrc1252
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Immune-cell infiltrates constitute a prominent component of the host response to cancer in some cases, but their functional significance remains incompletely understood. Cancer cells express antigens that can be recognized by both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Host-derived cytokines can suppress tumour formation by controlling infection, inflammation and immunity. Tumour cells can exploit host-derived cytokines to promote growth, increase resistance to apoptosis and foster dissemination. The systemic administration of cytokines can elicit antitumour effects, but the toxicities that are associated with this treatment often resemble a state of severe infection and can therefore be limiting. Tumour cells can be genetically modified to express particular cytokines that stimulate the host immune response, thereby acquiring the capacity to function as cancer vaccines. Antibody blockade of the CTLA-4 inhibitory receptor on T cells is a promising strategy to increase the potency of cancer vaccines, albeit with a risk of compromising tolerance to self-antigens.

Journal

Nature Reviews CancerSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.