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Diet overlap among two Asian carp and three native fishes in backwater lakes on the Illinois and Mississippi rivers

Diet overlap among two Asian carp and three native fishes in backwater lakes on the Illinois and... Bighead and silver carp are well established in the Mississippi River basin following their accidental introduction in the 1980s. Referred to collectively as Asian carp, these species are filter feeders consuming phytoplankton and zooplankton. We examined diet overlap and electivity of Asian carp and three native filter feeding fishes, bigmouth buffalo, gizzard shad, and paddlefish, in backwater lakes of the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. Rotifers, Keratella spp., Brachionus spp., and Trichocerca spp., were the most common prey items consumed by Asian carp and gizzard shad, whereas crustacean zooplankton were the preferred prey of paddlefish. Bigmouth buffalo diet was broad, including both rotifers and crustacean zooplankton. Dietary overlap with Asian carp was greatest for gizzard shad followed by bigmouth buffalo, but we found little diet overlap for paddlefish. Diet similarity based on taxonomy correlated strongly with diet similarity based on size suggesting filtration efficiency influenced the overlap patterns we observed. Although rotifers were the most common prey item consumed by both bighead and silver carp, we found a negative relation between silver carp CPUE and cladoceran density. The competitive effect of Asian carp on native fishes may be forestalled because of the high productivity of Illinois and Mississippi river habitats, yet the potential for negative consequences of Asian carp in less productive ecosystems, including Lake Michigan, should not be underestimated. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Invasions Springer Journals

Diet overlap among two Asian carp and three native fishes in backwater lakes on the Illinois and Mississippi rivers

Biological Invasions , Volume 11 (3) – May 31, 2008

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References (59)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Developmental Biology; Ecology; Plant Sciences ; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1387-3547
eISSN
1573-1464
DOI
10.1007/s10530-008-9265-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bighead and silver carp are well established in the Mississippi River basin following their accidental introduction in the 1980s. Referred to collectively as Asian carp, these species are filter feeders consuming phytoplankton and zooplankton. We examined diet overlap and electivity of Asian carp and three native filter feeding fishes, bigmouth buffalo, gizzard shad, and paddlefish, in backwater lakes of the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. Rotifers, Keratella spp., Brachionus spp., and Trichocerca spp., were the most common prey items consumed by Asian carp and gizzard shad, whereas crustacean zooplankton were the preferred prey of paddlefish. Bigmouth buffalo diet was broad, including both rotifers and crustacean zooplankton. Dietary overlap with Asian carp was greatest for gizzard shad followed by bigmouth buffalo, but we found little diet overlap for paddlefish. Diet similarity based on taxonomy correlated strongly with diet similarity based on size suggesting filtration efficiency influenced the overlap patterns we observed. Although rotifers were the most common prey item consumed by both bighead and silver carp, we found a negative relation between silver carp CPUE and cladoceran density. The competitive effect of Asian carp on native fishes may be forestalled because of the high productivity of Illinois and Mississippi river habitats, yet the potential for negative consequences of Asian carp in less productive ecosystems, including Lake Michigan, should not be underestimated.

Journal

Biological InvasionsSpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2008

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