Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Egalitarian motives in humans

Egalitarian motives in humans A behavioural study has provided clear evidence that egalitarian sentiment is a cause for punishment in multilateral human interactions. In a laboratory game, players were allocated different sums of money, and were then able to 'reward' or 'punish' others by giving or taking money away. The richest players were penalized the hardest, whilst the poorest were penalized the least. The players appeared to be motivated by an emotional reaction to inequality, since they reduced and increased others' incomes at a personal cost, even when there was no cooperative behaviour to be reinforced. Egalitarian motives could be an important factor in the evolution of reciprocity and cooperation in humans. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/egalitarian-motives-in-humans-5vC7q3eGLZ

References (18)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/nature05651
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A behavioural study has provided clear evidence that egalitarian sentiment is a cause for punishment in multilateral human interactions. In a laboratory game, players were allocated different sums of money, and were then able to 'reward' or 'punish' others by giving or taking money away. The richest players were penalized the hardest, whilst the poorest were penalized the least. The players appeared to be motivated by an emotional reaction to inequality, since they reduced and increased others' incomes at a personal cost, even when there was no cooperative behaviour to be reinforced. Egalitarian motives could be an important factor in the evolution of reciprocity and cooperation in humans.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 12, 2007

There are no references for this article.