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Electoral and Partisan Cycles in Fiscal Policy: An Examination of Canadian Provinces

Electoral and Partisan Cycles in Fiscal Policy: An Examination of Canadian Provinces This paper examines the fiscal policy choices of Canadian provincial governments in the context of partisan and opportunistic cycles. We identify an electoral cycle in which the predilection of provincial governments of all political stripes to increase taxes is temporarily halted in election years. Opportunistic responses in spending are also present. Spending in highly visible areas (schools, roads and hockey rinks) tends to increase in election years. Partisan responses are largely absent from revenues but appear more frequently in program spending choices. Thus, Canadian political parties tend to favour differentiating amongst themselves via their spending, as opposed to their revenue, choices. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Tax and Public Finance Springer Journals

Electoral and Partisan Cycles in Fiscal Policy: An Examination of Canadian Provinces

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References (21)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Economics; Public Finance; Business Taxation/Tax Law; Public Finance
ISSN
0927-5940
eISSN
1573-6970
DOI
10.1023/A:1012895211073
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper examines the fiscal policy choices of Canadian provincial governments in the context of partisan and opportunistic cycles. We identify an electoral cycle in which the predilection of provincial governments of all political stripes to increase taxes is temporarily halted in election years. Opportunistic responses in spending are also present. Spending in highly visible areas (schools, roads and hockey rinks) tends to increase in election years. Partisan responses are largely absent from revenues but appear more frequently in program spending choices. Thus, Canadian political parties tend to favour differentiating amongst themselves via their spending, as opposed to their revenue, choices.

Journal

International Tax and Public FinanceSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 17, 2004

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