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Endangered Forest, Endangered People: Environmentalist Representations of Indigenous Knowledge

Endangered Forest, Endangered People: Environmentalist Representations of Indigenous Knowledge Since 1987, Penan foragers in Malaysia have been increasingly affected by the activities of logging companies, and have protested this with blockades. Simultaneously, they have become the focus of a broad-based international environmental campaign. This paper examines the rhetoric of that campaign. In particular, I examine the ways in which Western environmentalists have constructed Penan land rights with reference to Penan knowledge of the landscape and of the biotic elements which exist there. Further, I consider how environmentalists have drawn on ethnographic accounts, and how those accounts are transformed in the process of generating images deployed in the campaign. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Ecology Springer Journals

Endangered Forest, Endangered People: Environmentalist Representations of Indigenous Knowledge

Human Ecology , Volume 25 (1) – Sep 17, 2004

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References (56)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Social Sciences; Anthropology; Environmental Management; Geography, general; Sociology, general
ISSN
0300-7839
eISSN
1572-9915
DOI
10.1023/A:1021983819369
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Since 1987, Penan foragers in Malaysia have been increasingly affected by the activities of logging companies, and have protested this with blockades. Simultaneously, they have become the focus of a broad-based international environmental campaign. This paper examines the rhetoric of that campaign. In particular, I examine the ways in which Western environmentalists have constructed Penan land rights with reference to Penan knowledge of the landscape and of the biotic elements which exist there. Further, I consider how environmentalists have drawn on ethnographic accounts, and how those accounts are transformed in the process of generating images deployed in the campaign.

Journal

Human EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 17, 2004

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