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Endocrine Disruptors: Time to Act

Endocrine Disruptors: Time to Act Recent decades have seen progress in the identification and quantification of a wide array of chemicals with endocrine-active properties. Exposure to these so-called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been implicated in an increase in certain adverse health effects, and some new prospective birth cohort studies have yielded suggestive results on these exposure-effect relationships. Major research efforts have focused on the EDC exposure of women of child-bearing age, because of concerns about embryonic and fetal susceptibility to these chemicals. Investigations have shown that mothers and children are exposed to a complex mixture of compounds; therefore, studies on the health impact of EDC exposure should not be limited to the individual effects of single agents but should rather consider the cumulative effects of multiple chemicals. There is considerable political debate about the need for measures to reduce or avoid exposure to EDCs. While a tighter regulation of exposure to EDCs is being implemented, health professionals and public health practitioners should acquire knowledge of the problem, recognize exposure, and warn the general population about the health risks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Environmental Health Reports Springer Journals

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References (81)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer International Publishing AG
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Medicine/Public Health, general; Environmental Health
eISSN
2196-5412
DOI
10.1007/s40572-014-0025-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent decades have seen progress in the identification and quantification of a wide array of chemicals with endocrine-active properties. Exposure to these so-called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been implicated in an increase in certain adverse health effects, and some new prospective birth cohort studies have yielded suggestive results on these exposure-effect relationships. Major research efforts have focused on the EDC exposure of women of child-bearing age, because of concerns about embryonic and fetal susceptibility to these chemicals. Investigations have shown that mothers and children are exposed to a complex mixture of compounds; therefore, studies on the health impact of EDC exposure should not be limited to the individual effects of single agents but should rather consider the cumulative effects of multiple chemicals. There is considerable political debate about the need for measures to reduce or avoid exposure to EDCs. While a tighter regulation of exposure to EDCs is being implemented, health professionals and public health practitioners should acquire knowledge of the problem, recognize exposure, and warn the general population about the health risks.

Journal

Current Environmental Health ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 16, 2014

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