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Evolutionary history of Ash Meadows pupfish (genus Cyprinodon) populations inferred using microsatellite markers

Evolutionary history of Ash Meadows pupfish (genus Cyprinodon) populations inferred using... Pupfish (genus Cyprinodon) persist in a series of isolated warm springs in Death Valley. Here we describe an analysis of microsatellite variation at six loci for nine populations encompassing three distinct taxa. Levels of genetic variation within populations and the pattern of relatedness among populations are best explained by spring elevation. Springs at higher elevations harbored less variation and exhibited greater among population divergence than lower elevation springs. This pattern reflects regional paleohydrological history showing a declining water table over the last 20,000 years. Continuing decline of the water table, a trend accelerated by local ground water mining, portends a future of increasing isolation and declining within-population variation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Genetics Springer Journals

Evolutionary history of Ash Meadows pupfish (genus Cyprinodon) populations inferred using microsatellite markers

Conservation Genetics , Volume 5 (6) – Dec 30, 2004

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References (52)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics; Evolutionary Biology; Plant Sciences; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology
ISSN
1566-0621
eISSN
1572-9737
DOI
10.1007/s10592-004-1978-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pupfish (genus Cyprinodon) persist in a series of isolated warm springs in Death Valley. Here we describe an analysis of microsatellite variation at six loci for nine populations encompassing three distinct taxa. Levels of genetic variation within populations and the pattern of relatedness among populations are best explained by spring elevation. Springs at higher elevations harbored less variation and exhibited greater among population divergence than lower elevation springs. This pattern reflects regional paleohydrological history showing a declining water table over the last 20,000 years. Continuing decline of the water table, a trend accelerated by local ground water mining, portends a future of increasing isolation and declining within-population variation.

Journal

Conservation GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 30, 2004

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