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Exploitation and Misrule in Colonial and Postcolonial AfricaPrecolonial Imaginaries and Colonial Legacies in Mobutu’s “Authentic” Zaïre

Exploitation and Misrule in Colonial and Postcolonial Africa: Precolonial Imaginaries and... [Lazure Vieira examines the doctrine of authenticité, Mobutu’s self-described “African philosophy” whose aim was to reconcile ideas of the past informed by precolonial times with the exigencies of modernity. According to Mobutu, authenticité represented a departure from the ferocity of the colonial experience and provided a comprehensive value system (cultural, political, legal, and economic) to harmonize the past with the present. Lazure Vieira challenges both claims, arguing that the degree of authenticity of authenticité’s rhetoric is debatable, and that its archetypes often reproduced the colonial violence it insisted on refuting. The author concludes by suggesting some features of Congolese society, practices like kindoki, toro, iloki, or evu may reveal possible strategies of insubordination and resistance despite their attempted discontinuation under the “modern” terms of authenticité.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Exploitation and Misrule in Colonial and Postcolonial AfricaPrecolonial Imaginaries and Colonial Legacies in Mobutu’s “Authentic” Zaïre

Part of the African Histories and Modernities Book Series
Editors: Kalu, Kenneth; Falola, Toyin

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG, part of Springer Nature 2019
ISBN
978-3-319-96495-9
Pages
165 –190
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-96496-6_8
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Lazure Vieira examines the doctrine of authenticité, Mobutu’s self-described “African philosophy” whose aim was to reconcile ideas of the past informed by precolonial times with the exigencies of modernity. According to Mobutu, authenticité represented a departure from the ferocity of the colonial experience and provided a comprehensive value system (cultural, political, legal, and economic) to harmonize the past with the present. Lazure Vieira challenges both claims, arguing that the degree of authenticity of authenticité’s rhetoric is debatable, and that its archetypes often reproduced the colonial violence it insisted on refuting. The author concludes by suggesting some features of Congolese society, practices like kindoki, toro, iloki, or evu may reveal possible strategies of insubordination and resistance despite their attempted discontinuation under the “modern” terms of authenticité.]

Published: Oct 9, 2018

Keywords: Congolese; Mobutu Sese Seko; MacGaffey; State-Society Struggle; Family Ut

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