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Fundamentals of CavitationNuclei and Cavitation

Fundamentals of Cavitation: Nuclei and Cavitation 2. NUCLEI AND CAVITATION 2.1. INTRODUCTION 2.1.1. LIQUID TENSION In chapter 1, possible differences between the actual value of the cavitation threshold and the vapor pressure were discussed. In real flows as in laboratory flows, liquids can actually sustain absolute pressures lower than the vapor pressure at the operating temperature and even negative pressures, i.e. tensions. To explain these discrepancies, one must first refer to the classical data relating to liquid breakdown. In the nineteenth century [DONNY 1846, BERTHELOT 1850, REYNOLDS 1882], experiments demonstrated that a liquid at rest could sustain negative pressures without vaporization occurring. For water, the values were of the order of several tens of bars. More recent experiments [TEMPERLEY 1946, BRIGGS 1950, R EES & TREVENA 1966] have shown that the experimental values are rather scattered (for example, BRIGGS obtained 277 bars). They depend on the experimental procedure, the preliminary treatment of the liquid (for example, degassing or pressurization over a long period) and the degree of cleanliness of the container wall. It is often not clear whether the limit corresponds to a loss of cohesion in the bulk liquid or a loss of adhesion of the liquid to the walls. These experimental values are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Fundamentals of CavitationNuclei and Cavitation

Part of the Fluid Mechanics and Its Applications Book Series (volume 76)
Fundamentals of Cavitation — Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005
ISBN
978-1-4020-2232-6
Pages
15 –33
DOI
10.1007/1-4020-2233-6_2
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

2. NUCLEI AND CAVITATION 2.1. INTRODUCTION 2.1.1. LIQUID TENSION In chapter 1, possible differences between the actual value of the cavitation threshold and the vapor pressure were discussed. In real flows as in laboratory flows, liquids can actually sustain absolute pressures lower than the vapor pressure at the operating temperature and even negative pressures, i.e. tensions. To explain these discrepancies, one must first refer to the classical data relating to liquid breakdown. In the nineteenth century [DONNY 1846, BERTHELOT 1850, REYNOLDS 1882], experiments demonstrated that a liquid at rest could sustain negative pressures without vaporization occurring. For water, the values were of the order of several tens of bars. More recent experiments [TEMPERLEY 1946, BRIGGS 1950, R EES & TREVENA 1966] have shown that the experimental values are rather scattered (for example, BRIGGS obtained 277 bars). They depend on the experimental procedure, the preliminary treatment of the liquid (for example, degassing or pressurization over a long period) and the degree of cleanliness of the container wall. It is often not clear whether the limit corresponds to a loss of cohesion in the bulk liquid or a loss of adhesion of the liquid to the walls. These experimental values are

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: Critical Pressure; Thermal Boundary Layer; Bubble Cavitation; Diffusive Equilibrium; Cumulative Histogram

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