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Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000Introduction

Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000: Introduction [Fungal infections or mycoses are the great neglected diseases of medical history.1 There are numerous histories of viral, bacterial and protozoan infections, for all times and all places, but very few studies of those caused by fungi. Why? It cannot be because of prevalence. Historical sources and contemporary epidemiological investigations show that fungal infections were and are ubiquitous in human and animal populations. Everyone in Britain and the United States in the last half a century would have heard of, if not suffered from, athlete’s foot or thrush. In the first half of the twentieth century, children feared the school nurse finding ringworm on their scalp and having to endure, not only the pains of X-ray depilation or having their shaven head painted with gentian violet, but also exclusion from school and the shame of being stigmatised as ‘unclean’.2] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000Introduction

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and the Author(s) 2013
ISBN
978-1-137-39263-3
Pages
1 –16
DOI
10.1057/9781137377029_1
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Fungal infections or mycoses are the great neglected diseases of medical history.1 There are numerous histories of viral, bacterial and protozoan infections, for all times and all places, but very few studies of those caused by fungi. Why? It cannot be because of prevalence. Historical sources and contemporary epidemiological investigations show that fungal infections were and are ubiquitous in human and animal populations. Everyone in Britain and the United States in the last half a century would have heard of, if not suffered from, athlete’s foot or thrush. In the first half of the twentieth century, children feared the school nurse finding ringworm on their scalp and having to endure, not only the pains of X-ray depilation or having their shaven head painted with gentian violet, but also exclusion from school and the shame of being stigmatised as ‘unclean’.2]

Published: Dec 15, 2015

Keywords: Twentieth Century; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome; Fungal Disease; Invasive Mycosis; Systemic Mycosis

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