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Future social rank: forecasting status in the green anole (Anolis carolinensis)

Future social rank: forecasting status in the green anole (Anolis carolinensis) Predicting the future social standing of an individual without aggressive social interaction may seem contradictory, as formation of social rank depends on agonistic interactions. In the lizard Anolis carolinensis, predicting social rank is possible using latency to eyespot formation (sympathetic darkening of postorbital skin from green to black during stressful agonistic interactions), because they form more rapidly in male lizards that become dominant. Darkened eyespots also inhibit aggressive behavior. As the timing of eyespot formation appears to be an important component of stress responsiveness and future social status, we hypothesized that a proactive disposition toward non-aggressive behavior, such as feeding and courtship, would be associated with aggressiveness. We assessed the relationship between rank and the temporal dynamics of eyespot formation, latencies to aggressive display, feeding, and reproductive behavior. Male lizards that became dominant were faster to respond to all types of stimuli tested (aggression, feeding, and courtship). The temporal dynamics of the neuroendocrine stress response appear to influence the motivation for behavioral response. Animals that recover from stress more quickly also eat, court, and fight more readily. In summary, this work suggests that latencies to aggressive, reproductive, and feeding behavior, as well as eyespot signals, are reliable predictors of future social status of individual male A. carolinensis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png acta ethologica Springer Journals

Future social rank: forecasting status in the green anole (Anolis carolinensis)

acta ethologica , Volume 9 (1) – Jul 12, 2006

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer-Verlag and ISPA
Subject
Life Sciences; Behavioral Sciences; Zoology; Evolutionary Biology
ISSN
0873-9749
eISSN
1437-9546
DOI
10.1007/s10211-006-0015-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Predicting the future social standing of an individual without aggressive social interaction may seem contradictory, as formation of social rank depends on agonistic interactions. In the lizard Anolis carolinensis, predicting social rank is possible using latency to eyespot formation (sympathetic darkening of postorbital skin from green to black during stressful agonistic interactions), because they form more rapidly in male lizards that become dominant. Darkened eyespots also inhibit aggressive behavior. As the timing of eyespot formation appears to be an important component of stress responsiveness and future social status, we hypothesized that a proactive disposition toward non-aggressive behavior, such as feeding and courtship, would be associated with aggressiveness. We assessed the relationship between rank and the temporal dynamics of eyespot formation, latencies to aggressive display, feeding, and reproductive behavior. Male lizards that became dominant were faster to respond to all types of stimuli tested (aggression, feeding, and courtship). The temporal dynamics of the neuroendocrine stress response appear to influence the motivation for behavioral response. Animals that recover from stress more quickly also eat, court, and fight more readily. In summary, this work suggests that latencies to aggressive, reproductive, and feeding behavior, as well as eyespot signals, are reliable predictors of future social status of individual male A. carolinensis.

Journal

acta ethologicaSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 12, 2006

References