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Habitat-dependent effects of personality on survival and reproduction in red squirrels

Habitat-dependent effects of personality on survival and reproduction in red squirrels Variation in intrinsic (body mass, reproductive condition) and extrinsic factors (habitat quality, spatio-temporal variation in food availability) can affect the costs and benefits of personality traits. Relationships between personality and fitness components can vary with changes in population density and/or habitat quality. Here, using capture-mark-recapture data of individually marked Eurasian red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris), we explored whether indices of boldness and exploration are correlated with local survival in either of the sexes and with a measure of reproductive success in females, under different conditions of food availability. PCA scores derived from the number of captures (trappability) and number of different traps where an individual was captured (trap diversity), in the first 1 or 2 years of presence, were used as indices of personality (boldness and pure exploration). The relationships between boldness and local survival differed between habitats in both sexes. Bold squirrels survived better than shy ones in Norway spruce forest, while in the other two study areas (Scots pine or mixed spruce-fir forest), survival was lower for bolder squirrels. Pure exploration behavior was negatively correlated with local survival in all habitats and in both sexes. Female reproductive success increased with body mass and decreased with the tendency to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Springer Journals

Habitat-dependent effects of personality on survival and reproduction in red squirrels

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References (83)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Behavioral Sciences; Zoology; Animal Ecology
ISSN
0340-5443
eISSN
1432-0762
DOI
10.1007/s00265-018-2546-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Variation in intrinsic (body mass, reproductive condition) and extrinsic factors (habitat quality, spatio-temporal variation in food availability) can affect the costs and benefits of personality traits. Relationships between personality and fitness components can vary with changes in population density and/or habitat quality. Here, using capture-mark-recapture data of individually marked Eurasian red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris), we explored whether indices of boldness and exploration are correlated with local survival in either of the sexes and with a measure of reproductive success in females, under different conditions of food availability. PCA scores derived from the number of captures (trappability) and number of different traps where an individual was captured (trap diversity), in the first 1 or 2 years of presence, were used as indices of personality (boldness and pure exploration). The relationships between boldness and local survival differed between habitats in both sexes. Bold squirrels survived better than shy ones in Norway spruce forest, while in the other two study areas (Scots pine or mixed spruce-fir forest), survival was lower for bolder squirrels. Pure exploration behavior was negatively correlated with local survival in all habitats and in both sexes. Female reproductive success increased with body mass and decreased with the tendency to

Journal

Behavioral Ecology and SociobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 18, 2018

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