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Handbook of Quantitative Science and Technology ResearchMeasuring Science

Handbook of Quantitative Science and Technology Research: Measuring Science [After a review of developments in the quantitative study of science, particularly since the early 1970s, I focus on two current main lines of ‘measuring science’ based on bibliometric analysis. With the developments in the Leiden group as an example of daily practice, the measurement of research performance and, particularly, the importance of indicator standardisation are discussed, including aspects such as interdisciplinary relations, collaboration, ‘knowledge users’. Several important problems are addressed: language bias; timeliness; comparability of different research systems; statistical issues; and the ‘theory-invariance’ of indicators. Next, an introduction to the mapping of scientific fields is presented. Here basic concepts and issues of practical application of these ‘science maps’ are addressed. This contribution is concluded with general observations on current and near-future developments, including network-based approaches, necessary ‘next steps’ are formulated, and an answer is given to the question ‘Can science be measured?’] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Handbook of Quantitative Science and Technology ResearchMeasuring Science

Editors: Moed, Henk F.; Glänzel, Wolfgang; Schmoch, Ulrich

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References (92)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005
ISBN
978-1-4020-2702-4
Pages
19 –50
DOI
10.1007/1-4020-2755-9_2
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[After a review of developments in the quantitative study of science, particularly since the early 1970s, I focus on two current main lines of ‘measuring science’ based on bibliometric analysis. With the developments in the Leiden group as an example of daily practice, the measurement of research performance and, particularly, the importance of indicator standardisation are discussed, including aspects such as interdisciplinary relations, collaboration, ‘knowledge users’. Several important problems are addressed: language bias; timeliness; comparability of different research systems; statistical issues; and the ‘theory-invariance’ of indicators. Next, an introduction to the mapping of scientific fields is presented. Here basic concepts and issues of practical application of these ‘science maps’ are addressed. This contribution is concluded with general observations on current and near-future developments, including network-based approaches, necessary ‘next steps’ are formulated, and an answer is given to the question ‘Can science be measured?’]

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: Research Performance; Science Citation Index; Citation Analysis; Bibliometric Analysis; Bibliometric Indicator

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