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Helicobacter pylori Acquisition in Infancy after Decline of Maternal Passive Immunity

Helicobacter pylori Acquisition in Infancy after Decline of Maternal Passive Immunity We evaluated the natural history of Helicobacter pylori infection and the host immune response in 80 infants, and determined seroprevalence of H. pylori infection in their Taiwanese mothers. Decline in passively transferred maternal anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies and subsequent H. pylori infection was assessed in infants over 14 mo. A sensitive and specific, 96-well microtiter ELISA for the detection of H. pylori IgG antibodies was used to evaluate maternal serum (single specimen) and their infants (birth, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 14 mo). Sera were also evaluated by ELISA for the presence of anti-H. pylori IgM antibodies in the infants. Maternal H. pylori IgG seroprevalence was 62.5% [50/80; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 51-73%]. All infants born to the 50 seropositive mothers passively acquired maternal H. pylori IgG. Transplacentally transferred maternal anti-H. pylori IgG lasted until about the 3rd mo of life, and disappeared in nearly all the infants by 6 mo of age. Seven and one-half percent of infants (6/80; 95% CI, 3-16%) acquired H. pylori infection; two were born to H. pylori-negative mothers. Among the six IgG seropositive infants, an IgM response specific for H. pylori antigens was detected and appeared to precede the rise in IgG in five. We conclude that maternal passive transfer of IgG antibodies occurs in the infant and disappears by 6 mo of age. H. pylori infection is acquired in infancy in this population; IgM antibodies against H. pylori are detectable, seem short-lived, and appear to precede IgG antibody development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Research Springer Journals

Helicobacter pylori Acquisition in Infancy after Decline of Maternal Passive Immunity

Helicobacter pylori Acquisition in Infancy after Decline of Maternal Passive Immunity

Abstract

We evaluated the natural history of Helicobacter pylori infection and the host immune response in 80 infants, and determined seroprevalence of H. pylori infection in their Taiwanese mothers. Decline in passively transferred maternal anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies and subsequent H. pylori infection was assessed in infants over 14 mo. A sensitive and specific, 96-well microtiter ELISA for the detection of H. pylori IgG antibodies was used to evaluate maternal serum (single specimen) and their...
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References (48)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Pediatrics; Pediatric Surgery
ISSN
0031-3998
eISSN
1530-0447
DOI
10.1203/00006450-199705000-00007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We evaluated the natural history of Helicobacter pylori infection and the host immune response in 80 infants, and determined seroprevalence of H. pylori infection in their Taiwanese mothers. Decline in passively transferred maternal anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies and subsequent H. pylori infection was assessed in infants over 14 mo. A sensitive and specific, 96-well microtiter ELISA for the detection of H. pylori IgG antibodies was used to evaluate maternal serum (single specimen) and their infants (birth, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 14 mo). Sera were also evaluated by ELISA for the presence of anti-H. pylori IgM antibodies in the infants. Maternal H. pylori IgG seroprevalence was 62.5% [50/80; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 51-73%]. All infants born to the 50 seropositive mothers passively acquired maternal H. pylori IgG. Transplacentally transferred maternal anti-H. pylori IgG lasted until about the 3rd mo of life, and disappeared in nearly all the infants by 6 mo of age. Seven and one-half percent of infants (6/80; 95% CI, 3-16%) acquired H. pylori infection; two were born to H. pylori-negative mothers. Among the six IgG seropositive infants, an IgM response specific for H. pylori antigens was detected and appeared to precede the rise in IgG in five. We conclude that maternal passive transfer of IgG antibodies occurs in the infant and disappears by 6 mo of age. H. pylori infection is acquired in infancy in this population; IgM antibodies against H. pylori are detectable, seem short-lived, and appear to precede IgG antibody development.

Journal

Pediatric ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: May 1, 1997

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