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High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals the Diversity and Community Structure in Rhizosphere Soils of Three Endangered Plants in Western Ordos, China

High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals the Diversity and Community Structure in Rhizosphere Soils of... Abstract China's western Ordos is a distribution area for the extremely precious remnants of ancient Asian environments, which in endangered plant species and complex ecosystems. Accordingly, in this study, we collect three endangered plants belonging to the Zygophyllaceae family, namely Tetraena mongolica, Sarcozygium xanthoxylon, and Nitraria tangutorum Bobr. High-throughput sequencing technology was applied to study microbial diversity in these plant rhizosphere soils. Analysis of species composition abundance, Alpha diversity, Beta diversity and microbial structure are analyzed. 2428 bacterial OTUs and 1256 fungal OTUs are obtained from the rhizosphere soils, and the bacterial and fungal sequencing coverage is above 99%. Bacilli are the most abundant (86.91%) in the bacterial community. The fungal community has significant differences in three plants. The abundances of the genus Dothideomycetes in the rhizosphere soils of Tetraena mongolica and Sarcozygium xanthoxylon plants are the highest, which are 44.57% and 37.69%, respectively. Thus, Dothideomycetes is the dominant bacteria in the community. The genus Sordariomycetes in the rhizosphere soil is the dominant fungi with a relative abundance of 41.04%. Redundancy analysis revealed that microbial communities were closely related to environmental factors. Overall, this study bring new insights into the relationship between rhizosphere soils microbial diversity and environment to improving the adaptability of the endangered plants in survival environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Microbiology Springer Journals

High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals the Diversity and Community Structure in Rhizosphere Soils of Three Endangered Plants in Western Ordos, China

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References (68)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
2020 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
ISSN
0343-8651
eISSN
1432-0991
DOI
10.1007/s00284-020-02054-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract China's western Ordos is a distribution area for the extremely precious remnants of ancient Asian environments, which in endangered plant species and complex ecosystems. Accordingly, in this study, we collect three endangered plants belonging to the Zygophyllaceae family, namely Tetraena mongolica, Sarcozygium xanthoxylon, and Nitraria tangutorum Bobr. High-throughput sequencing technology was applied to study microbial diversity in these plant rhizosphere soils. Analysis of species composition abundance, Alpha diversity, Beta diversity and microbial structure are analyzed. 2428 bacterial OTUs and 1256 fungal OTUs are obtained from the rhizosphere soils, and the bacterial and fungal sequencing coverage is above 99%. Bacilli are the most abundant (86.91%) in the bacterial community. The fungal community has significant differences in three plants. The abundances of the genus Dothideomycetes in the rhizosphere soils of Tetraena mongolica and Sarcozygium xanthoxylon plants are the highest, which are 44.57% and 37.69%, respectively. Thus, Dothideomycetes is the dominant bacteria in the community. The genus Sordariomycetes in the rhizosphere soil is the dominant fungi with a relative abundance of 41.04%. Redundancy analysis revealed that microbial communities were closely related to environmental factors. Overall, this study bring new insights into the relationship between rhizosphere soils microbial diversity and environment to improving the adaptability of the endangered plants in survival environment.

Journal

Current MicrobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 1, 2020

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