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HIGHER EDUCATION:STUDYING COLLEGE ACCESS AND CHOICE: A PROPOSED CONCEPTUAL MODEL

HIGHER EDUCATION:: STUDYING COLLEGE ACCESS AND CHOICE: A PROPOSED CONCEPTUAL MODEL [The student financial aid programs that were authorized under Title IV of the Higher Education Act were intended to ensure that inadequate financial resources would not limit access to college. Nonetheless, despite substantial investment in student financial aid not only by the federal government but also by state governments, colleges and universities, and other entities, college access and choice remain stratified by socioeconomic status (SES) and race/ethnicity. Although students received about $122 billion in financial aid from all sources in 2003–04 (The College Board, 2004), individuals with low family incomes, individuals whose parents have not attended college, African-Americans, and Hispanics are less likely than other individuals to enroll in college. When they do enroll, these groups are concentrated in lower price institutions, such as public two-year colleges and less selective four-year colleges and universities (Baum and Payea, 2004; Ellwood and Kane, 2000; National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2003, 2004; Thomas and Perna, 2004).] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

HIGHER EDUCATION:STUDYING COLLEGE ACCESS AND CHOICE: A PROPOSED CONCEPTUAL MODEL

Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research Book Series (volume 21)
Editors: Smart, John C.
HIGHER EDUCATION: — Jan 1, 2006

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References (152)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer 2006
ISBN
978-1-4020-4509-7
Pages
99 –157
DOI
10.1007/1-4020-4512-3_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The student financial aid programs that were authorized under Title IV of the Higher Education Act were intended to ensure that inadequate financial resources would not limit access to college. Nonetheless, despite substantial investment in student financial aid not only by the federal government but also by state governments, colleges and universities, and other entities, college access and choice remain stratified by socioeconomic status (SES) and race/ethnicity. Although students received about $122 billion in financial aid from all sources in 2003–04 (The College Board, 2004), individuals with low family incomes, individuals whose parents have not attended college, African-Americans, and Hispanics are less likely than other individuals to enroll in college. When they do enroll, these groups are concentrated in lower price institutions, such as public two-year colleges and less selective four-year colleges and universities (Baum and Payea, 2004; Ellwood and Kane, 2000; National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2003, 2004; Thomas and Perna, 2004).]

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: Social Capital; Cultural Capital; High School Graduate; Educational Aspiration; College Enrollment

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