Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Illegal Palm Heart ( Geonoma edulis ) Harvest in Costa Rican National Parks: Patterns of Consumption and Extraction

Illegal Palm Heart ( Geonoma edulis ) Harvest in Costa Rican National Parks: Patterns of... Illegal Palm Heart ( Geonoma edulis ) Harvest in Costa Rican National Parks: Patterns of Consumption and Extraction . Illegal extraction of non-timber forest products in the tropics is widespread, and many protected areas face the challenge of balancing conservation needs with cultural practices related to the use and extraction of animals and plants. We studied the illegal wild palm heart extraction of Geonoma edulis , locally known as súrtuba , in Volcán Poás and Braulio Carrillo National Parks in Costa Rica. Through 96 questionnaires administered in three communities bordering these national parks, and by semistructured interviews with poachers and park managers, this study examined extraction and consumption motives, patterns, and frequencies. This palm is sought out by the communities for use during Holy Week to satisfy cultural traditions, for its associated nutritive value, and because of its unique bitter flavor, not comparable to domesticated palm heart. Whereas the majority of the respondents consume it during Holy Week (55.2%), a substantial number (27.1%) consume G. edulis palm heart at least once a month. The majority extract once a year (58%); however, a minority (2.1%) rely on G. edulis for economic subsistence. This accounts for 72.6% of the reported extraction (over 4,500 palms per year) and is supplying a year-round market for nontraditional use. Our results show that what most likely began as a cultural tradition has become an uncontrolled, nontraditional source of income. Additional efforts should determine the feasibility of limited extraction outside protected areas to satisfy traditional use. Such an effort entails the decentralization of biodiversity policies and innovative methods to implement protective measures, as well as incentives for community involvement in the management of this palm heart species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Economic Botany Springer Journals

Illegal Palm Heart ( Geonoma edulis ) Harvest in Costa Rican National Parks: Patterns of Consumption and Extraction

Economic Botany , Volume 63 (2) – Jun 1, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/illegal-palm-heart-geonoma-edulis-harvest-in-costa-rican-national-ZRgGXYjQ93

References (26)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by The New York Botanical Garden
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Ecology; Plant Physiology; Plant Anatomy/Development; Plant Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0013-0001
eISSN
1874-9364
DOI
10.1007/s12231-009-9081-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Illegal Palm Heart ( Geonoma edulis ) Harvest in Costa Rican National Parks: Patterns of Consumption and Extraction . Illegal extraction of non-timber forest products in the tropics is widespread, and many protected areas face the challenge of balancing conservation needs with cultural practices related to the use and extraction of animals and plants. We studied the illegal wild palm heart extraction of Geonoma edulis , locally known as súrtuba , in Volcán Poás and Braulio Carrillo National Parks in Costa Rica. Through 96 questionnaires administered in three communities bordering these national parks, and by semistructured interviews with poachers and park managers, this study examined extraction and consumption motives, patterns, and frequencies. This palm is sought out by the communities for use during Holy Week to satisfy cultural traditions, for its associated nutritive value, and because of its unique bitter flavor, not comparable to domesticated palm heart. Whereas the majority of the respondents consume it during Holy Week (55.2%), a substantial number (27.1%) consume G. edulis palm heart at least once a month. The majority extract once a year (58%); however, a minority (2.1%) rely on G. edulis for economic subsistence. This accounts for 72.6% of the reported extraction (over 4,500 palms per year) and is supplying a year-round market for nontraditional use. Our results show that what most likely began as a cultural tradition has become an uncontrolled, nontraditional source of income. Additional efforts should determine the feasibility of limited extraction outside protected areas to satisfy traditional use. Such an effort entails the decentralization of biodiversity policies and innovative methods to implement protective measures, as well as incentives for community involvement in the management of this palm heart species.

Journal

Economic BotanySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.